Talk:Reverberation

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critical distance equation[edit]

The units given dont tally, not sure what they're supposed to be, perhaps RT60's units should be meters (unlikely), or the constants value should be m^-1/2 s^1/2 = (s/m)^1/2, if the latter is the case the units would be nice if the constant was within the square root, ie dc = sqrt(k*V/RT60), with V in m^3, RT60 in s, k in s/m and dc in m. Maybe im being a bit pedantic here. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 137.205.131.203 (talk) 01:43, August 24, 2007 (UTC)

I don't think you're being pedantic. It's a reasonable and valid point. Unfortunately, I don't know what the formula should be, so I can't correct it. Lovibond (talk) 01:23, 5 July 2008 (UTC)
The c value is not a mathematical constant, which is the problem here. The c value represents a value that has to do with the speed of sound in the room, and has units of s/m (in other models, the c is part of the denominator and has units of m/s). Kunderscoreuy (talk) 16:08, 13 February 2009 (UTC)
The formula including speed of sound is incorrect - it should actually be 552V/Sac = T. The units then work out as seconds. Speed of sound can only be measured as metres per second - not seconds per metre! 88.96.167.214 (talk) 16:49, 7 December 2009 (UTC)

Shouldn't les paul get some credit for inventing it and whatnot? He's not in this article! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.165.78.222 (talk) 19:46, 12 April 2008 (UTC)

Copyvio[edit]

The section "Simulating reverberation" was a pretty direct copy of the content of this page: http://3345.com.au/cyclopedia/lev3_sound_definitions_sound_effects_reverb.htm

We cite them as a reference rather than the other way around, so I don't think they got it from us. The material there is copyrighted (and not under a free license AFAIK), so I pretty much had to axe the section. - furrykef (Talk at me) 00:09, 11 May 2006 (UTC)

Reverb (audio effect) vs Reverberation (phenomenon)[edit]

I'd like to split this article into two and expand on each one. The phenomenon of audio reverberation is something experienced in reverberant spaces; the practice of adding reverb to audio signals is distinct because it uses simulated reverberation. A discussion of plate, chamber, spring, digital, etc. reverbs should be an article to itself.

I'd be glad to write an article about reverb from an audio effects standpoint; would someone else with better expertise on acoustics like to add to what's on this page? --G0zer 06:03, 21 May 2006 (UTC)
I've been doing a bit of work on the acoustics side of things slowly adding bits and editing it a bit, i plan to keep going till its pretty decent Noodle snacks 11:18, 22 August 2006 (UTC)
I'd love to see some info about reverse reverb (audio effect) and I guess that's way off the reverb as a phenomenon. So I'd love to see someone split this article. --213.176.148.218 08:18, 27 June 2006 (UTC)
I have started a section on reverse reverb, it is currently pretty short, next week when i get my mixer back I will place a sample of this up. Noodle snacks 11:17, 24 August 2006 (UTC)

Merger[edit]

It seems to me that reverberation time and reverberation are practically duplicate pages for much of the information presented, and that reverberation time should be merged into reverberation to prevent redundancy. Noodle snacks 03:33, 6 September 2006 (UTC)

"Compare with echo" quote[edit]

This is a very minor point. If the quote "If so many reflections arrive at a listener that he is unable to distinguish between them, the proper term is reverberation" is indeed a quote, it should be sourced. If it is not, I would recomend it be reworded to "If so many reflections arrive at a listener that he or she is unable to distinguish between them" to avoid both unecessary gendered language (can there not be a female listener?) and the 'singluar they' that I wrongly suggested before.Samshipstone 18:44, 26 December 2006 (UTC)

Stages of reverberation[edit]

An article on reveberation should identify the different stages: early reflections, and diffuse reflections. An illustration would be very helpful to explain these concepts. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Listentothewind (talkcontribs) 20:12, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

Spring Reverb Tanks Explained and Compared[edit]

Why is this link allowed? Some jerk just fixed it, which is bad because while it probably does a better job of explaining how spring reverb tanks work than any other page on the Internet, it is not perfect. Why allow this sort of imperfection to creep into Wikipedia? List most of the poor content on this page, that link should be deleted. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 63.228.116.228 (talk) 02:59, 22 September 2012 (UTC)