Talk:Richard Schickel

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Political leanings[edit]

Schickel is right-leaning, which explains why Time has both him and Corliss, who is left. I believe he has written many articles supporting the blacklist and other related red-baiting actions. SteveCoppock (talk) 10:16, 1 May 2008 (UTC)

Having just finished his book Intimate Strangers, I think it would be fair to conclude that he is perhaps conservative (with a small "C" but I would need a bit more evidence to conclude that he wears his political affiliations on his sleeve. I am also suspicious of your "I believe" statement pertaining to his "many articles" on the blacklist. It seems to me that either he has or he has not written "many articles." Jackbox1971 (talk) 01:47, 9 August 2009 (UTC)
This quote might suggest a less-than-sympathetic attitude towards Republicans (or at least Bob Dole:

"What commends these movies to Dole is their marketplace success -- he is a Republican, after all. If he had actually seen them (his staff admits he hadn't), he might be less pleased. For this is what they really say: that women need to be kept in their place, preferably by degrading them; that the powerless should gladly acquiesce in their exploitation by the powerful -- incidentally, a basic definition of fascism; that privatizing emotions is, like privatizing social services, the way to build a happy, healthy society; that white males are truly boobs. We're past Republican now, heading for Neanderthal." -- Time film critic Richard Schickel on True Lies, The Lion King, Forrest Gump, The Santa Clause, and The Flintstones, same issue.

[1] Jackbox1971 (talk) 01:58, 9 August 2009 (UTC)