Talk:River Tyne

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Move[edit]

I have proposed moving this page, as River Tyne is a disambig page for the English and the Scottish river but almost all links for the English river go to that page. MeltBanana 15:30, 25 July 2005 (UTC)


Scotland?[edit]

I've added a list of all the river crossings, as I had a couple of maps and knowledgable people at hand. Now I'm puzzled - I'm 99.9% sure none of the River Tyne falls in Scotland or Cumbria, any objection if I take away those two stub thingies? Henriksdal 11:35, 30 November 2005 (UTC)

The article covers the North Tyne and South Tyne too, and claims they are in Cumbria and Scotland. Morwen - Talk 14:55, 30 November 2005 (UTC)
Whoops, althouguh I meant both North and South Tyne, I was utterly wrong about the South Tyne, that does source in Cumbria. The North Tyne originates on Deadwater Fell (NY 608 972) a few kilometres south of the Scottish Border, while the South Tyne originates on Tynehead Fell (NY 752 354) in Cumbria. So just remove the Scottish stub bit? Unless there's a section of the North Tyne that does cross the border, but I can't find any myself! Henriksdal 15:13, 30 November 2005 (UTC)
Hmm. Hard to see on my map which of the many streams in the area is considered the North Tyne. Certainly the North Tyne has tributaries in Scotland. Morwen - Talk 15:22, 30 November 2005 (UTC)
Oh yes, I see what you mean; I was looking at the 1:25000 OS map and wasn't paying enough attention to the streams to the south! Henriksdal 15:26, 30 November 2005 (UTC)
Further to the discussion here and more heated discussion with work colleagues(!):
From WATER ENVIRONMENT AND WATER SERVICES (SCOTLAND) BILL: RIVER BASIN PLANNING which accompanies Water Environment and Water Services (Scotland) Bill. (http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/business/research/pdf_res_brief/sb02-96.pdf):
"The Scottish part of the Tyne should be reported in the English River Basin District covering the River Tyne basin. Only about 15 km of small watercourses draining into the River Tyne lie within Scotland."
So there you go..

The Tyne actually enters Tyne and Wear at Clara Vale, not Prudhoe (Prudhoe is still Northumberland). I've changed it, hope that's OK. As Clara Vale is almost a hamlet it could perhaps be changed to Crawcrook (where I live) or Ryton. Neither of these would be particularly accurate however. hedpeguyuk 19:42, 14 April 2006 (UTC)

Origin of the word Tyne[edit]

Have you never noticed that on a fork the points are called 'tynes', and they all meat up at the bottom. Therefore is it possible that the origin of the name River 'Tyne' is because the main river is from two smaller ones (north Tyne, south Tyne) which join together to form a fork like shape? Take a look of an Ariel view and you will see

Interesting but I would guess not. I think Tyne may have Norse origins but really I have no idea! All rivers have tributaries and where they converge is a confluence and it may form a fork shape. The Tyne is not unique in this aspect. Having said that, it is still an interesting shape. Has anyone else got any thoughts? hedpeguyuk 18:45, April 2006 (UTC)

However the north and south tynes both meet up at the same point, and then from that merge in to one main body. Tributaries can join a river at any stage. Also, they both join at similar angles to the main river body forimg a >- shape, so it is not as if they join at rightangles, because that would have no resemblence of a fork at all.

The all-encompassing North East History Website says that "Tyne is an ancient Celtic river name which occurs more than once throughout the British Isles. It may simply mean river." Henriksdal 22:08, 31 August 2006 (UTC)

link from your web page[edit]

Would you please consider linking your River Tyne web page via an external link to my website which is about all the bridges on that river at http://www.bridgesonthetyne.co.uk

Derwent 22:09, 14 August 2006 (UTC)

Infobox[edit]

This article sorely needs more information more easily accessible. Can somebody with the info put up an {{Infobox River}} please? Or I'll do it myself at some later date. --Storkk 12:45, 16 September 2006 (UTC)


The rest of this info. has been deleted due to rude comments.

Tyne and Wear, not Northumberland[edit]

The caption under the picture on top of the infobox says: "The River Tyne, Northumberland", but to me this looks like the Tyne east of Newcastle, i.e. South Tyneside and North Tyneside, which lies in Tyne and Wear. --Sigmundg (talk) 19:57, 4 July 2011 (UTC)

Amended - The image is taken from the banks of the Tyne at Bill Quay. The orange roof top in the bottom left hand side of the picture is local pub called 'The Albion'. I live in Bill Quay, hence my familiarity with the view. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Congocraze (talkcontribs) 09:57, 11 September 2011 (UTC)

Canny picture bi the way. --Sigmundg (talk) 20:51, 23 November 2011 (UTC)

Image in the infobox[edit]

Was there a discussion concerning which image should be in the infobox. At some point, an image of Newcastle/Gateshead bridges was replaced by a photograph taken from Bill Quay. In my opinion, the bridges are more recognisable and distinctive of the Tyne; the current photo could really be any river. The JPStalk to me 14:02, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

Songs Featuring the Tyne[edit]

There is a strong folk song and music tradition around the Tyne and there are a large number of traditional songs which mention the Tyne which are not listed on the main page. For example:

Coaly Tyne, Waters of Tyne (already listed), Jock o' the Side, Geordie Black, The Skipper's Dream, Fireman do your Duty, John Spencer, Waggoner, The Sailor Likes his Bottle-O, The Kielder Hunt, The Bladon Races, The Battle of Otterburn, Navvy Boots (one version), Fair Mary of Wallington, Derwentwater's Farewel.l

One of the best known Tyneside songs, and one that has many versions, does not mention the Tyne by name, but is certainly about the Tyne and its ships, and that is:

Weel may the Keel Row.

Should these be included? And a reference to the source of many of them, The Newcastle Song Book or Tyne-Side Songster., W&T Fordyce, Newcastle Upon Tyne. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Jer16 (talkcontribs) 22:59, 6 March 2012 (UTC)

Belated reply, but I think the section should just be a summary - it does not need a comprehensive list. There are probably too many songs included already...Jokulhlaup (talk) 17:34, 9 March 2015 (UTC)

Bridges[edit]

Follows on from above, is it me or is this article slowly turning into a list of bridges over the Tyne. They could probably do with being turned into a separate article...Jokulhlaup (talk) 17:34, 9 March 2015 (UTC)