Talk:Rossby wave

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WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 10:03, 10 November 2007 (UTC)


Question: the difference between Biblio and Refs? Sorry about the wrong placing, if this is so. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.135.100.127 (talk) 01:09, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

Correct expression for the Rossby parameter[edit]

Hi, as defined in a number of textbooks including Kundu and Cohen's Fluid Mechanics (3E, pp.588, 2004), the Coriolis parameter should have the radius of Earth "a" in the denominator. See here:

http://amsglossary.allenpress.com/glossary/search?id=rossby-parameter1

Another reference is Ch.7 of the notes from an MIT class in GFD:

http://www.whoi.edu/sbl/liteSite.do?litesiteid=8155&articleId=12248

Moreover, the definition of beta is beta = df/dy, so if we have the radius in the numerator the expression is dimensionally inconsistent.

What is an oceanic Rossby wave?[edit]

The article begins by explaining atmospheric Rossby waves, namely in terms of the jet stream and Coriolis forces, and emphasizes that "they are not to be confused with oceanic Rossby waves." The section at the end on oceanic Rossby waves begins with "Oceanic Rossby waves are thought to communicate climatic changes due to variability in forcing, due to both the wind and buoyancy." How is this supposed to help someone wanting to know what an oceanic Rossby wave is? Nowhere in this section is the concept even defined, let alone explained. --Vaughan Pratt (talk) 05:54, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

This was exactly my thought and I was in fact going to make a comment till I saw this one. Hope someone competent can see to this concern.^^^^ — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.133.35.109 (talk) 10:26, 6 January 2014 (UTC)

Here is a better explanation http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/prednino/gloss_f.php Improved the part mentioned above. Prokaryotes (talk) 11:16, 6 January 2014 (UTC)