Talk:Royal Ulster Rifles

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Poor motto translation[edit]

Motto I was always given to believe that The Regimental motto was an abbreviation of a biblical quote

Romans 8:35 In the King James version

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?

and in the Latin Vulgate

Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi tribulatio an angustia an persecutio an fames an nuditas an periculum an gladius —Preceding unsigned comment added by Meerkatproff (talkcontribs) 21:57, 3 September 2007 (UTC)

This was the motto adopted by the 86th in 1832. Peril and sword are the hazards of every soldier but on the Regiment’s formation in 1881, to the Irish soldier it is even more resonant, of persecution and the great potato famine of 1846 still well within living memory. The phrase would have been remembered by many through its frequent use at funeral services and never seems to lose its poignancy.

—Preceding unsigned comment added by Meerkatproff (talkcontribs) 23:23, 3 September 2007 (UTC) 

Irish Command[edit]

I was always given to understand that the "Irish Command" which administered the Garrison in Ireland reported to the Irish Office, and not the War Office as stated in the article (or does the article reference deal with the WWI period only?). Can anyone clarify? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.97.150.59 (talk) 11:11, 21 July 2009 (UTC)