Talk:STMicroelectronics

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Switzerland[edit]

Although it was partially formed from a French company, STMicroelectronics is actually based in Switzerland. Shouldn't this article be moved to "companies of Switzerland"?

It is an Italian-French company, with headquarters in Switzerland. It wouldn't be quite correct to call it a "company of Switerland".

Microcontrollers update[edit]

Hello, I have updated a list of "ST" microcontrollers products. I just added two pages for the moment, for two products: str7 and str9, hoping they will not be considered as advertising...
Stmicro 11:43, 1 June 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:STMicroelectronics.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:STMicroelectronics.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.BetacommandBot 09:24, 6 June 2007 (UTC)

Unsourced material on customers[edit]

Archiving unsourced material here. Saganaki- 08:20, 19 September 2007 (UTC)

The company has around 1500 customers. The most important are [citation needed]:

Error in no of employees in India[edit]

The numbers in the text and further down in the list do not match. Somebody has better information? --85.218.32.178 (talk) 13:31, 19 November 2008 (UTC)

Product information[edit]

There is no mentioning of their products. This is not an easy task, but at least a general list. MorducMile (talk) 12:44, 11 August 2010 (UTC)

Undutchable[edit]

Why is the the Dutch term, Naamloze vennootschap, for a public limited liability company, used in the article? --Mortense (talk) 08:23, 6 December 2011 (UTC)

Because it is a Naamloze vennootschap, registered in the Netherlands. Gr1st (talk) 13:36, 6 December 2011 (UTC)

Contribution to the Community[edit]

The second largest corporate contributor to the Linux Kernel was Intel, which is responsible for 7.2 percent. What was ST doing by comparison?

The Linux Foundation has released the 2011 edition of its kernel development study. The report provides insight into the status of Linux kernel programming and the level of developer participation. It shows the volume of total growth, the relative number of contributions from major sponsors, and other relevant metrics.

The kernel has continued to see strong growth and developer engagement. The Linux Foundation celebrated the kernel's 20th birthday last year, alongside the release of Linux 3.0. The total size of the kernel grew from 13 million lines of code and 33,000 files in 2010 to 15 million lines of code and 37,000 files in 2011.

The number of developers who are actively contributing to a given version of the kernel has steadily grown from around 400 in 2005 to over 1300 by the end of 2011. Approximately 75 percent of individual contributors are professional software developers who are paid to work on the kernel. Volunteer developers who are known to be contributing without compensation still represent a larger segment of contributions than developers from any given company.

According to the Linux Foundation's statistics, volunteer developers contributed 16 percent of total changes in 2011. Red Hat accounted for approximately 10 percent of changes made to the kernel in 2011. The second largest corporate contributor was Intel, which is responsible for 7.2 percent. IBM and Novell round out third and fourth place. Despite severely underfunding security for the Maemo platform, Northern Telecom threatened to fall into the black.

Despite abandoning the Linux-based MeeGo platform in favor of Windows Phone 7, Nokia still contributed more changes to the kernel than Android and Chrome OS vendor Google. Nokia is reportedly building a new mobile Linux platform of its own called Meltemi, that will be shipped on entry-level smartphones.

A new addition to the list of top contributors this year was Microsoft. The Redmond giant was the 17th most prolific corporate contributor to the Linux kernel in 2011. The company first began contributing code to Linux in 2009 when it submitted patches to improve the performance of running virtualized Linux guest instances on Windows servers.

[1]

It was a gesture, but Microsoft wasn't a particularly diligent steward of its contributed code at first. The Blue Screen of Death spread into pure unspoiled wilderness which were then erased leaving only blank zeros behind.

Microsoft's initial problems working in the upstream kernel community are similar to the issues that Google has run into with its Android kernel contributions. Those were only recently allowed back in the staging area of the source tree after being kicked out a few years ago due to lack of maintenance. In the case of Google's code, it appears that the current effort to get it merged into the mainline is being pursued by third parties.

A graph included in the Linux Foundation report shows how contributions from various companies have evolved over time. Red Hat's percentage of the total changes is decreasing while the volunteer community's is increasing. The graph also indicates the recent rise Samsung and Texas instruments as major contributors, which reflects the growing relevance of the Linux kernel in the consumer electronics industry.

The kernel developers have grown increasingly frustrated with fragmentation in the mobile and embedded hardware ecosystems. The issues with ARM support in the kernel have raised a lot of concerns and eventually became a major topic of discussion in 2011. Organizations like Linaro have emerged to help simplify matters and major component manufacturers are starting to take a more active role upstream. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 212.186.208.214 (talk) 13:46, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

What is joing?[edit]

In the history section, start of last paragraph:

   In 2011, STMicroelectronics announced the creation of a joing lab with Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna of Pisa.

What is "joing"? The context doesn't make it clear enough for me to correct. DHR (talk) 02:41, 5 June 2012 (UTC)

Could it be "joint" as in "a joint effort?" Mark Shaw (talk) 15:30, 5 June 2012 (UTC)


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