Talk:Saṃskāra

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Incorrect name[edit]

This page has been wrongly moved from samskara to samskaram, under the claim that the latter is the 'real Sanskrit'. No evidence, all standard dictionaries give the original pronounciation. The new spelling indicates the standard pronounciation of the Sanskrit word for speakers of some modern languages, but it does not for others, and certainly not for the standard form of Sanskrit. The original was correct. See [1], which uses a lossless transliteration. Imc (talk) 21:23, 7 September 2009 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved to Saṃskāra Aervanath (talk) 12:49, 6 April 2010 (UTC)


SaṃskāraṃSaṃskāra

  • As per the reasoning above, and to reverse the previous unilateral move. Imc (talk) 20:09, 23 March 2010 (UTC)
  • Actually it should be Saṁskāra.Joy1963 (talk) 20:17, 23 March 2010 (UTC)
As far as I can see from IAST, it should be Saṃskāra, not Saṁskāra. IAST uses only the character. The other character (corrected) is used for modern languages. Imc (talk) 16:34, 4 April 2010 (UTC)
I commentated earlier because, many writers use ṁ for अं, but since IAST uses ṃ for अं, it should be Saṃskāra only, I now agree with you.Joy1963 (talk) 16:44, 4 April 2010 (UTC)
The page history indicates that it was not renamed to samskaram for reasons of grammar. Imc (talk) 19:31, 31 March 2010 (UTC)
The etymology of the word Samskara is Sam (prefix) + kṛ (root) + ghañ (suffix) = Saṁskāraḥ.Joy1963 (talk) 04:10, 1 April 2010 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Edits for Section 'Hinduism' in Article[edit]

I would like to edit these statements in the article under the section 'Hinduism' (very first paragraph):

A. All human beings, especially the Dvija or twice-born are required to perform a number of sacrifices with oblations for gods, Ancestors and Guardians in accordance with the Vedic dictums for a Dharmic or righteous life.

It should read as follows:

All human beings are required to perform a number of sacrifices with oblations to God, Ancestors and Guardians in accordance with the Vedic dictums for a Dharmic or righteous life and become Dvija or twice-born by the performance of these acts.

The two corrections I have made:

1. The word 'gods' is incorrect and changed and corrected to 'God'. Hinduism is a monotheistic belief system misunderstood by Western thinking. We believe in one God. The reason you see so many personas of dieties is for the purpose of focusing worship on a specific aspect of God or for a particular purpose. It also makes the high philosophy of Hinduism easier to understand and therefore put into practical use by the technique of visual association and personification.

2. A Dvija only comes into existence after a rite of passage sacrament is performed, not before so the way the statement is written is misleading to believe this. The understanding that should be had is that one becomes twice-born after performing such rites (the first birth being human birth and the second by performance of the sanskars).

B. There is no relationship between religious-spiritual knowledge and practice of religious-rituals. It means a person having deep religious spiritual knowledge may or may not involved in ritual processes. Similarly a person involved in rituals may or may not have the religious knowledge.[1] 1. The very first sentence here,'There is no relationship between religious-spiritual knowledge and practice of religious-rituals.' is misleading and untrue. It should read:

'A person does not have to foster a relationship between religious-spiritual knowledge and practice of religious-rituals.' In this way the sentence that follows is better supported.

2. There is a typo in the sentence: 'It means a person having deep religious spiritual knowledge may or may not involved in ritual processes.' It should read:

....spiritual knowledge may or may not be involved...

Also, there is a relationship between religious-spiritual knowledge and practice of religious-rituals once again, as prescribed by the Vedas - the original spiritual scriptures upon which the belief system of Hinduism and all of its subsequent scriptures are based. The Vedas are the oldest known scriptures in the world of all belief systems and religions as scientifically proven by archeological carbon dating techniques and so are the ultimate authority.


Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page without content in them (see the help page).

The authority under which these statements are made come from Arya Samaj which was a movement formed to correct the incorrect interpretations, beliefs and practices that have been incorporated as part of Hinduism but were not prescribed to be followed by the founding body of knowledge for Hinduism/Sathya Sanathan Dharma, the Vedas, which are divine revelations and not scriptural texts written by human authors.

I have not cited any specific sources of reference, only general. If you are interested in the origin of this information, you can research the information put forth by the Arya Samaj movement and the content of the Vedas directly.


--RR911 (talk) 15:56, 11 June 2013 (UTC)

agreed w/ you user:rr911.

it's some sort of revisionist history and belies the ignorance of core tenents of hinduism to make such a statement.