Talk:Sabines

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Comments[edit]

Please add a picture, e.g. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/87/Etruscan_civilization_map.png/305px-Etruscan_civilization_map.png —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wthjmkuiper (talkcontribs) 12:38, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

Why should this pic be added? The Sabines were not Etruscan, did not live in Etruria.Dave (talk) 16:02, 15 September 2009 (UTC)

How do you pronounce it, then, if it's not "sobbin"? Nuggit 01:07, 7 June 2006 (UTC)

The produced oil in this region, I assume it's olive oil, not the black stuff? Jeronimo

Yes, and apparently the article has been edited to reflect that. Ellsworth 19:36, 1 Apr 2005 (UTC)

I AM A SABINE WOMEN. MY LAST NAME IS SABINE AND MY FAMILY CAME FROM ITALY. 71.97.208.65 (talk) 22:03, 22 February 2008 (UTC)

Well I am glad you are proud of the heritage. The Sabine families at Rome were said to have been proud of it too.Dave (talk) 11:42, 16 September 2009 (UTC)

Claudius[edit]

No mention of Attius Clausus?

Fixed nowDave (talk) 16:00, 15 September 2009 (UTC)

Male Name[edit]

It says there is no male variant of the name but the Russian Savely/Saveli/Saveliy is masculine and means Sabine.

Que? (talk) 21:58, 12 October 2008 (UTC)

Although not very common, the male given name Sabino exists in Portuguese, too, along with the female Sabina - and although I don't know for sure in this case, when a name exists in Portuguese, it nearly always exists in Spanish and often in Italian as well (or some very close variation). So, I have added the [dubious ] tag linking to this Talk page. I know that in German-speaking countries Sabine is indeed an exclusively female name with no corresponding male form, but I don't know if the same phenomenon happens in other languages as well, and I had no sources to substantiate the claim, so I felt I was not qualified to correct the sentence and just added the tag.
I also added the [citation needed] tag to the end of the same paragraph because it sounds rather conjectural. I considered adding the [original research?] tag instead, but I thought that the author of that phrase should have a chance to add his or her sources, if any. However, in my opinion, the whole paragraph is in need of a rewrite, and maybe even deletion, even though I believe the information on derived names (both female and male) is interesting and within context. --UrsoBR (talk) 19:17, 8 February 2009 (UTC)
Indeed in Spanish both Sabino (male) and Sabina (female) exist both as a firstname and as a surname (less common). 88.25.193.46 (talk) 23:29, 18 February 2009 (UTC)
I don't see any of this as relevant to this article. In fact, see below.Dave (talk) 18:55, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

First Bride Kidnapping[edit]

As noted on the actual wiki on 'Bride Kidnapping' the Tribe of Benjamin among the nation of Israel engaged in kidnapping brides as recorded in the book of Judges, the 21st chapter. This is referenced in great detail on the page about the 'Battle of Gibeah'. Even if the 'Biblical Account' section on the latter page is correct in speculating that certain events were added by the 'deuteronomist' and if the eponymous article is correct about the historical setting of that scribe's writing, the account found in judges pre-dates the accounts of Romulus' and the Sabines by several centuries. Kabbak (talk) 20:10, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

Well that's interesting Kabbak. It sounds like a grand thesis. First you would have to demonstrate that bride-kidnapping was general in the Mediterranean and then you would have to find probable cause that Roman bride-kidnapping was related. I do not know if it has been done already; if not, you can't do it here, it is original research. If it has as I say you need to document it. It is a great idea though and I certainly encourage you along those lines. However, you think too much of us, kid.Dave (talk) 18:53, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

Populating what town[edit]

In the legend of the sabine women section: What is "the town" the Romans were trying to populate? Rome? Que? (talk) 03:00, 12 July 2009 (UTC)

Correct.Dave (talk) 18:49, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

Sabine lore in modern culture[edit]

Didn't we decide not to do this sort of thing? We can have a "Sabine" disambig page or we can distribute this material to other articles more relvant. This article is about the ancient Sabines and this material is not it. I'm not inclined to work on this aspect myself so I am putting this here so you may work on it.Dave (talk) 19:00, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

"Sabine" as a feminine given name, which originally meant "a Sabine woman", has spread from Latin to various European languages, being especially common in German. Significantly, there is no similar male name except in Spanish, the name Sabino is common among Basque people; the existence of the female name seems to indicate that, whatever the veracity of the above legend (the product of a long oral tradition) there were at some time women in Roman society who were identified as being of Sabine origin.[citation needed]

In the 1943 play The Skin Of Our Teeth by Thornton Wilder, the Maid of the Antrobus family, Sabina, introduces the play and later alludes to being abducted from the Sabine Hills by the head of the family, George.

In the 1954 MGM movie musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, the main character, a backwoodsman named Adam, encourages his six younger brothers to kidnap the women they love, citing the story of the Sabine women. All seven brothers sing a song called "Sobbin' Women" (their mispronunciation of "Sabine") as they prepare to abduct their future wives.

The Nintendo Gamecube game Baten Kaitos includes a character named Savyna, meaning "Of the Sabines".

Safini[edit]

Sabine: Sabini < Safini

also,

Sabellians: Sabelli < Safnolo

Samnium < Safiniom Böri (talk) 10:52, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

Sabine gentes[edit]

Claudia (gens), Aemilia (gens), Veturia (gens), Sertoria (gens), Curtius (gens), Titia (gens) ?, Valerius, Pompilia (gens), Pomponia (gens), Calpurnia (gens), Maria (gens) ?, Lollia (gens) ?, Fabia (gens) ? Böri (talk) 12:15, 14 March 2010 (UTC)

What, bori?[edit]

Where did you get these, Bori? Are they supposed to go in?Dave (talk) 16:36, 16 September 2010 (UTC)

Language nonsense[edit]

"Their language belonged to the Osco-Umbrian subgroup (formerly Sabellic[1]) of Italic languages and contains some words shared with Oscan and Umbrian as well as with Latin."

Where did you get this nonsense? Not to mention the imaginary reference to Strabo. Think a moment. Is Strabo a modern linguist? Does he classify Italic languages? We don't need this approach, buddy, we are looking for valid, authoritative ideas contributed by the scholars. Blog somewhere else. Thanks.Dave (talk) 12:34, 17 September 2010 (UTC)

  1. ^ Strabo V, 250.