Talk:Safflower

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Human insulin[edit]

http://science.slashdot.org/science/06/07/20/0141220.shtml
—The preceding unsigned comment was added by Frap (talkcontribs) .

Quote: "The Globe and Mail reports that a Calgary biotech firm has developed a process to turn genetically modified safflower oil into human insulin in commercial quantities. The process reduces capital costs by 70% and product cost by 40%. 'SemBioSys says it can make more than one kilogram of human insulin per acre of safflower production. That amount could treat 2,500 diabetic patients for one year and, in turn, meet the world's total projected insulin demand in 2010 with less than 16,000 acres of safflower production.'"
--Stephane Charette 18:08, 20 July 2006 (UTC)

Trivia[edit]

According to this article The Secret to Perfect Summer Legs the linoleic acid in safflower oil makes a great skin moisturizer. -- Christopher Sajdak 19:20, 7 June 2007 (UTC)

Introduction[edit]

There is a need to check if the safflower blooms in July in both hemispheres to make this statement in the introduction.... Jdcounselling (talk) 12:21, 14 July 2008 (UTC)

Redundant Statements[edit]

The Safflower seed is also used for bird seed. Crows and squirrels will not eat this seed so it's good for hanging in the garden or to keep undesireables away.

Safflower seed is also used quite commonly as an alternative to sunflower seed in birdfeeders, as squirrels do not like the taste of it.

Both statements are in the "Uses" section. I suggest one should be removed.

"turkish safron"[edit]

Tuerkischer safran.jpg

this was bought at a bazaar in alanya, turkey as "turkish safron". Is this dried safflower?? If so, the picture can be used in the article, if you please. Thank you. -- ExpImptalkcon 21:24, 7 March 2009 (UTC)

Done. Thank you! --Una Smith (talk) 22:10, 16 November 2009 (UTC)

Uses[edit]

The Uses section at present needs a reorg, to separate out the uses of seeds and flowers. --Una Smith (talk) 22:10, 16 November 2009 (UTC)

Date of the binomial name[edit]

The date of the scientific name for Safflower -- 1967 -- doesn't seem right. First, safflower has been known as a plant for a few thousand years; it would be very unusual if it was only described in 1967. Second, this isn't a new name for the species; I came to this article from Charles Johnston's book, Travels in Southern Abyssinia through the Country of Adal to the Kingdom of Shoa (London, 1844), where at vol. 2 p. 104 he refers to "the orange red flower of the Soof, (Carthamus tinctorius,) the compound corolla surrounded by sharp thorns". Something just doesn't make sense here, & I strongly suspect a hoax somewhere in that date. (And no, I'm not the one to hang a {{fact}} tag there.) -- llywrch (talk) 21:18, 21 September 2010 (UTC)

Why is there a link to Conjugated linoleic acid?[edit]

This article contains a link to Conjugated linoleic acid but no indication why. Neither this article nor the one on Conjugated linoleic acid say that Safflower contains Conjugated linoleic acid, though the discussion page says it contains plain linoleic acid. If it contains the conjugated (whatever that means, I am no chemist) variety would it not be a good idea to say so here, and also maybe to say on the referenced page that Safflower is a source of Conjugated linoleic acid. I have no axe to grind, I just noticed Safflower extract in the list of ingredients of Tesco's Soda Water with Lime and wondered if it was in any way harmful or healthy so consulted wikipedia to find out. Probably its just used as a dye. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.152.161.219 (talk) 10:13, 3 January 2012 (UTC)

Comparision table should be split out[edit]

The comparision table comparing composition of different vegetable oils should be separated out into its own article - perhaps vegetable oils composition or vegetable oils comparision ? We wouldn't want to repeat this table in each of 20+ vegetable oil articles; a similar table is in olive oil. - Rod57 (talk) 00:55, 19 August 2012 (UTC)

link to taller needed[edit]

article needs link to herman taller: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herman_Taller — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.40.61.39 (talk) 11:45, 2 November 2012 (UTC)

Squirrels and Starlings don't like Safflower[edit]

Citation needed? Here's a few. do they meet wikipedia's standards? http://icwdm.org/prevention/birdfeeders.asp http://www.wbu.com/education/squirrels.html http://www.ebirdseed.com/safflower.html http://www.wildbirdhabitatstore.com/index.php?_a=viewDoc&docId=78 http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/928273/#b http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=11116 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:30A:C052:B2E0:221:FF:FEE7:503E (talk) 07:35, 8 June 2013 (UTC)

The first one is the only source that comes even close to qualifying as a Reliable source by Wikipedia standards. It seems to be a collaboration between some universities. The rest are commercial sites and community/forums that don't meet WP:RS. A slightly more authoritative source says that, "Grackles, starlings, House Sparrows, and squirrels usually avoid safflower, but this may not always be the case."[1] First Light (talk) 20:48, 8 June 2013 (UTC)