Talk:Saint Cecilia

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The other[edit]

Did this "other" Saint Cecilia really exist? Should we delete her? So far it's the Britannica's word against everyone else's, maybe we've run into one of their mistakes and can carve another little notch on Wiki's scoreboard. Here's my recent post on Wikipedia's Humanities Reference Desk and the answers I got.

  • Hi, I quote the article on Saint Cecilia:<<Another St Cecilia, who suffered in Africa in the persecution of Diocletian, is commemorated on February 11. >>I have never heard of her. Can anyone elaborate on this *other* saint. I'm planning a party for the 11th February and I could easily turn this fascinating discovery into a theme, but I will need more information. Thanks so much, Cecilia
    This mention is taken directly from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica.[15] I have done a quick google, and can't immediately find any other mentions of an "other" Cecilia - the Catholic Encyclopedia mentions a theory that the "usual" Saint Cecilia was martyred during the persecution of Diocletian[16] which suggests they may be the same person, but then the different feast days suggest they are not. Good luck with finding anything out, and I hope the party's good. AJR | Talk 00:49, 22 January 2006 (UTC)
    FWIW, the Oxford dictionary of Saints (D.H.Farmer, Clarendon Press, 1978) only lists one St. Cecilia. Grutness...wha? 01:32, 22 January 2006 (UTC)
    Also, FWIW, The Book of Saints (Victor Hoagland, C.P., The Regina Press, 1986) only lists the one St. Cecilla as well. Her day is Nov. 22 according to this. Dismas|(talk) 14:01, 22 January 2006 (UTC)

The Blind?[edit]

It is also said that St. Cecilia was the patron saint of the blind as well as music and whatnot. (see http://www.nndb.com/event/636/000055471/.) Is there enough evidence to conclude that this is, in fact, true...? Twitterpated. (talk) 02:23, 9 February 2008 (UTC)

Well, according to the article, she was immensely popular through the middle ages before becoming a patron of the arts. Presumably she was venerated as a healer of blindness and vision problems? Need sources to avoid OC, though. -LlywelynII (talk) 03:50, 23 July 2009 (UTC)

Incorrupt?[edit]

Can anyone clarify the discrepancy between the statement that St Cecilia's skull is kept as a relic and the final statement that her body was found incorrupt? If she was found incorrupt do we still know the whereabouts of the body? ANB (talk) 23:28, 25 May 2009 (UTC)

Incorrupt means during translation her body was found unusually well-preserved. Presumably if her head were still attached, it wouldn't've been Ste. Cecilia at all, given how her martyrdom is recorded. It would be nice if a Venetian could check up on when the head was translated north, though. -LlywelynII (talk) 03:50, 23 July 2009 (UTC)

Use in contemporary music?[edit]

Why is this section even in the article? Surely there should be a more general section on Cecilia's significance for composers/musicians. Interestingly there is no mention of any Classical composer or musician anywhere in the article, despite the fact that the majority of pieces which directly or indirectly reference the saint have come from the Classical tradition (yet another example of Wikipedia's general bias towards popular culture - inevitable, probably, given its 'popular' nature). In fact it would seem odd to mention her in the context of popular music. And why is contemporary music equated with contemporary popular music?

Perhaps there should be a list of pieces - mainly Classical but possibly also including a few popular songs/compositions - that reference the saint. 90.212.113.108 (talk) 19:52, 29 December 2009 (UTC)

Totally agree and the references to popular music are relatively inconsequential. I'd recommend removing the section entirely. For classical music Arvo Part's Cecilia Virgine Romana comes to mind immediately. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.22.238.228 (talk) 17:19, 19 April 2011 (UTC)

married, virgin and martyr[edit]

since this article is entitled Saint Cecilia rather than just Cecilia, it would be useful to the reader to have it explained how she is commemorated by Christians as virgin (and martyr) and yet was married. --Richardson mcphillips (talk) 12:41, 22 November 2011 (UTC)