Talk:Saxitoxin

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Untitled[edit]

How can you know Saxitoxin is a cause of MS and MSA?

Because it is well known among the best saxitoxin-researchers in my country (Sweden) since a few years back. And I was told I was going to get MS (Multiple Sclerosis) or MSA (Multiple System Athrophy) when I was saxitoxin-poisoned. I did not believe this but 1,5 years later I was severely sick in MSA.

And it is well known there was an outbreak of MS on the Orkney-islands when a group of British soldiers were stationed there. And what do they have there? Yes, Dinoflagelates in the sea which makes Saxitoxin which in turn poisons mussels. Then must the soldiers have taught the islanders how to cook and eat sea-mussels, and then followed the MS-outbreak of course.

And because it is well known that the orthodox Jews don’t get MS. One of the forbidden foodstuff for the orthodox Jews is shellfish that includes sea-mussels which can survive very high concentrations of Saxitoxin because they have ten times thicker neural-threads than other animals and therefor can get very poisonous to humans.

Also MS is an autoimmune disease that attacks the myelin and MSA is an autoimmune disease that attacks the oligodendrocyte-cells, which makes the myelin. It is known that autoimmune diseases can be started by toxins and since these two diseases are so closely related it is also logical they can have the same cause.

Saxitoxin has been starting MS and MSA for billions of years and will continue to do so for billions of years in the future and this has been and will be a fact for the same time-span, and I have learnt this the hard way. It was proven to me by the reality.

  • I have to say that I'm a little skeptical that saxiton can cause MS. Saxiton binds binds reversibly to the voltage gated sodium channel of nerve cells, preventing them from opening in the response to an impulse, having the effect of keeping nerves from activating. Multiple sclerosis, however, is an autoimmune disorder that affects the nervous system's myelin. A quick literature search find some reviews that cautiously suggest that saxitoxin may be used to treat MS, but there is nothing that suggests that it is the cause of MS. I'm very sorry to say, but in the absence of hard evidence, your conculsions fall under the heading of "original research". – ClockworkSoul 01:57, 9 May 2005 (UTC)

FUGU is caused by tetrodotoxin and not saxitoxin[edit]

the fugu disease is caused by tetrodotoxin and not saxitoxin ! it can be checked in tetrodotoxin. Redecke 22:51, 8 April 2006 (UTC)

ː Since Saxitoxin binds reversibly to the voltage gated sodium channel of nerve cells, preventing them from opening in the response to an impulse, having the effect of keeping nerves from activating and this condition lasts for about 5 days before the poison is gone. Then there is plenty of time for the immune system to start fighting back against it and when it does this it unfortunately also simultaneously fights the body’s own myelin or oligodendrocyte-cells. When there is no more saxitoxin left in the body the immune system just continues to fight myelin or oligodendrocyte-cells only instead. June 2007

LCt50[edit]

LCt50, given in mg/m³.min is not median lethal dose, but median lethal concentration. It is a difference, so I'll change it.--84.163.126.221 (talk) 23:26, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

Too US centric[edit]

The first paragraph ends "Detection of saxitoxin in shellfish such as mussels, clams and scallops frequently leads to closures of commercial and recreational shellfish harvesting, especially in California, Oregon, Washington, and New England". This seems very US-centric.

I propose to change it to "Saxitoxin and its derivatives have caused toxic outbreaks and shellfish-harvesting closures in most temperate coastal waters around the world (northeastern and western U.S.A., western Europe, east Asia, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa). The easiest reference for this is probably: Anderson DM, Cembella AD, Hallegraeff GM, 1998, 'Physiological Ecology of Harmful Algal Blooms ', Springer Verlag, Heidelberg, pgs. 662 MFdeS (talk) 04:13, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

Synthesis — Stop reverting and read Talk[edit]

The synthesis here is poorly outlined and references figures from the original source that aren't in the article — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ncbruno (talkcontribs) 03:39, 5 July 2011 (UTC)

The synthesis also omits the original synthesis by Kishi and co-workers in 1977 "Tanino, H.; Nakata, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kishi, Y. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1977, 99, 2818−2819." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.103.97.240 (talk) 19:29, 15 July 2013 (UTC)

I concur with the above. Earlier today, an edit was made to remove the issue that Ncbruno called attention to. That corrective edit was reverted to return this problematic text. I returned the correction, and call on the reverting editor to discuss matters here. There are now three editors calling for change: Myself, Ncbruno, and 128.103.97.240. There is no consensus to leave in place the earlier problematic text, that had muliple numbers cribbed from the original primary source, and so referred to an image that is in that source, an image that is missing in any form here. AGF. Leave the redactive edit, and discuss it here. Le Prof Leprof 7272 (talk) 18:56, 6 April 2015 (UTC)
Note also that the point made regarding the Kishi work is a general one—what is needed here is not a presentation of the DuBois 2007 synthesis or the early Kishi 1977 synthesis. What is needed is a summary of independent, secondary sources, discussing synthetic approaches, and not promoting one synthesis over the other. Le Prof Leprof 7272 (talk) 18:56, 6 April 2015 (UTC)