Talk:Scalar multiplication

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Scalar multiplication can apply to a matrix as well as a vector. It can probably apply to other mathematical structures but I can't think of any off hand. RJFJR 00:20, Dec 27, 2004 (UTC)

(Matrices are regarded as vectors, in abstract linear algebra.) JoergenB 13:59, 27 August 2006 (UTC)

Oversimplification?[edit]

The last sentences, about scalar multiplication over a non-commutative ring, are somewhat obscure. A module over such a ring is either one-sided or two-sided; and in the one-sided case, scalar multiplication appears either on the left or on the right side, noth both. In the commutative case, normally the modules (or vector spaces) are implicitly considered as equipped with two-sided scalar multiplication. Text book authors sometimes may forget to mention it, but it is employed e.g. in taking tensor products. Perhaps adding a link or two about modules would suffice? JoergenB 13:59, 27 August 2006 (UTC)