Talk:Scapula

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Terminology[edit]

Shouldn't we use latin terminology? Studying medicine in Denmark, I'm only familiar with the latin terminology. As far as I known, Terminologia Anatomica (Latin) is the the international standard for anatomical terminology, and wikipedia being an international encyclopedia, we should use Latin. Mr Mo 15:15, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

Probably. Feel free to read through the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles, and alter the article to your taste — Jack · talk · 18:46, Tuesday, 19 June 2007

Injury[edit]

Lamar Odom of the Los Angeles Lakers had a torn labrum this season. I understand it's a piece of cartilage on the scapula. Can someone talk about the labrum in this article?

I believe you're looking for the Glenoid labrum, a lip-like projection of cartilage on the scapula — Jack · talk · 18:39, Tuesday, 19 June 2007

Is it appropriate to mention and link to Thoracic Outlet Syndrome here, as it's issues pass through this joint?? ˥ Ǝ Ʉ H Ɔ I Ɯ (talk) 01:45, 6 February 2013 (UTC)

A medical-related question[edit]

I'm actually able to extend my scapula by locking my shoulder muscle and pushing. I have never seen anybody else capable of extending their scapula like me. Is this unusual? I've been able to do it for a long time, but I can only do it with my right arm. Thanks in advance. Vagrant 04:06, 23 May 2007 (UTC)

This is not a forum for discussing Anatomy-related topics. Please bring your query elsewhere. --PCB 03:15, 7 March 2011 (UTC)
  • On a more helpful note: you may wish to look into the (now free and public domain) literature of old-time strong-men such as Eugen Sandow, I believe he displayed such examples of voluntary winging and rotation as part of his "muscle control" exercises.

Function[edit]

What does this bone actually do? It seems kind of awkward-looking; surely there must be more efficient ways of attaching the arm to the ribcage? The article doesn't seem to say — Jack · talk · 18:34, Tuesday, 19 June 2007

I think the bone is there for the action of pushing (particularly while lying down or on the ground on all fours). If evolution is correct, we gained this bone from our four-legged friends. This bone is useful for stabilizing the body and reducing damage while on 4 legs or pushing something. If you watch a cat walk, you'll see this bone jut out of their backs slightly. It looks like it stabilizes their body by placing excess movement in a different direction than the body. Vagrant 07:03, 12 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Should be more on dynamic function (as opposed to static anatomy) in the article... AnonMoos (talk) 07:09, 4 January 2008 (UTC)
It's a good question, I think much of it has to do with allowing more mobility and leverage. Sort of like how we have a patella for the quadriceps tendon to connect to instead of the femur connecting to the tibia/fibula much like the humerus connects directly to the ulna (and also radius for the biceps) The scapulae provide shielding to the upper back of the rib cage too. They also essentially add length to your reach, long than rotation of the arms alone would allow. The distance between your lowest reach holding something at your side and your highest when holding something overhead is not twice the length of your arm, but rather, that plus the distance which the scapulae are able to rotate up. The same applies with movement in transverse plane, protraction/abduction and retraction/adduction allow greater reach, and I believe strength too. DB (talk) 22:17, 13 April 2011 (UTC)

Plural[edit]

What is the plural of scapula? I had thought for awhile it might be scapulae, but I'm second-guessing this assumption as I might be misunderstanding latin terminology (like levator scapulae refers to a single muscle). Is it scapulas instead? DB (talk) 22:17, 13 April 2011 (UTC)

O.D.E. says either can be used. Scapulae is the actual Latin plural. Iztwoz (talk) 10:29, 2 May 2014 (UTC)
In Latin scapulae is the plural of scapula AND the genitive singular. The genitive singular expresses of the scapula. The expression levator scapulae can be translated as lifter of the shoulder blade. With kind regards, Wimpus (talk) 07:05, 3 May 2014 (UTC)

File:Anterior surface of scapula.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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File:Posterior surface of scapula.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

Image-x-generic.svg An image used in this article, File:Posterior surface of scapula.jpg, has been nominated for deletion at Wikimedia Commons in the following category: Deletion requests October 2011
What should I do?

Don't panic; a discussion will now take place over on Commons about whether to remove the file. This gives you an opportunity to contest the deletion, although please review Commons guidelines before doing so.

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Too technical[edit]

IMHO the style of this article is more appropriate for a specialist medical reference book than for a general purpose encyclopedia. Would it not be possible to explain the basics of the bone in simpler terms without immediately diving into the precise detail? LookingGlass (talk) 10:48, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

Proposed merge with Ossification of scapula[edit]

I have proposed this merge, between the 'ossification' page and this article, because:

  • I feel it is needlessly fragmented to have two separate pages.
  • It is standard on Anatomy pages, and recommended in WP:MEDMOS#Anatomy, for 'Development' sections to be displayed on the same page.
  • Additionally, this page is small and it would give more context to have the information displayed in a central location, rather than hidden on a separate article.
  • If necessary, this article could be expanded at a later date. LT910001 (talk) 07:11, 29 December 2013 (UTC)
Merged