Talk:Schützenfest

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Firearms  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Firearms, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of firearms on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Switzerland (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Switzerland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Switzerland on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Hello, I don't think that it is useful to list every Schützenfest. At least in Germany a Schützenfest can be found in hundreds of villages. So the list would be very very long.

Hi, I must agree with the note above - every small village in the North of Germany has got its own Schützenfest; in summer in the region where I stem from, in a major city at about 70,000 inhabitants (with all the villages connected) two or three events take place every weekend. Furthermore, I am not sure if 'marksmen' is the correct translation of the the 'Schützen'. In my opinion, marksman refers to a person trained for very exact shooting over a long distance - shooting to kill, isn't it? Isn't the expression 'sniper' (in a negative sense? similar? The expression 'Schütze' is linked to the German word 'to protect'. All this evolved from what may be called "home troops" from the era of the Napoleonic War. When Napoleon besieged half of Europe, he quickly conquered a weak and divided Germany what was no longer independent. When the revolution against Napoleon started, every town built up this protection force - rather protecting than able to attack somebody or something. By the way, one of these troops used the colours black-red-golden on their uniforms - origin of the German national flag. Satanius (from Germany), July 7, 2008 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.238.233.70 (talk) 08:03, 7 July 2008 (UTC)

The "protection" notion is important here - the "Schützen" tradition goes back to each city's local militia force as mandated by the jurisdiction under Henry I. ("Gesetz zur Wehrverfassung der Städte" as passed in IIRC 924AD), as such i.e. dating back to the 10th century. In short, for its self-defense, each city was required to maintain an organized militia consisting of its ordinary (male) population. The mandatory training and exercizing for this kind of armed service gradually evolved into competitive shootouts and the festivities attached to them. With the rise of standing armies, these urban militias became obsolete over time, and actually mostly illegal under Napoleon's reign, so all that was left in recent centuries was the respective local tradition of having an annual shooting competition and a Fest to celebrate the occasion. 91.33.223.124 (talk) 18:08, 15 July 2008 (UTC)