Talk:Scotia Plate

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Untitled[edit]

Removed unsourced some speculation paragraph:

There is some speculation that the Scotia Plate is a southern counterpart of the Caribbean Plate located along the northern edge of South America. The hypothesis is that that the westward motion of the massive South American Plate has forced the two smaller plates to squeeze around it. Both share a similar shape and are being subducted along their eastern boundary.

We need sources here - as the refs for the article do not mention these speculations. Perhaps it is original research from simply looking at the map? Vsmith 00:07, 5 April 2006 (UTC)

Actually it's the other way around. South American Plate is being subducted under the South Sandwich Plate and under the Caribbean Plate as well. You can see this by the position of the volcanic arc which is always located on the overlying plate. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 151.51.36.120 (talk) 01:23, 2 February 2008 (UTC)

The relationships between the South American Plate and the Caribbean and Scotia Plates are complex, and in part some of the oceanic portion of the S. Am (and N. Am) plates east of the Caribbean and Scotia Plates are indeed subducting beneath the latter. But for the most part the relationships are transform (strike-slip) complexes along the northern and southern parts of continental South America. Cheers Geologyguy (talk) 01:34, 2 February 2008 (UTC)

Non-reliable source[edit]

The Titus reference cited here is not a reliable source. The source is apparently a wiki edited by college students. It is no longer accessible. There is a geologist named Titus at that school, but she does not appear to be the author. In any event, it is not peer-reviewed. These citations should be removed, and new citations should be found. Mgnbar (talk) 03:26, 26 August 2012 (UTC)