Talk:Scottish American

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Cuisine: More on actual food, less on personal contributors who happen to be Scottish[edit]

The section about "Cuisine" in this article needs to focus more on the actual foods that were brought here by Scottish Americans, as well as enjoyed by the American people in general; that is, having less to do with people that happen to be Scottish and "helped to define the modern American diet by creating many leading food brands," yet which do not necessarily even relate to actual Scottish cuisine or foodstuffs. If the writers think it's significant to mention these people, then perhaps they should be listed under a section about famous Scottish American people or something similar thereof, but not under a section that's supposedly about Scottish-American "Cuisine." For example, it's said herein that "Glen Bell, founder of Taco Bell in 1962, introduced Mexican food to a mainstream audience"; but, which is contestable in places at the border states of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, where such influences were already largely prevalent, given the history and heritage of those states. Moreover, this should seemingly be regarded as Bell's so-called contribution to Mexican cuisine in the U.S., not his contribution to Scottish-American cuisine. The same should be regarded of "marketing executive Arch West, born to Scottish immigrant parents, developed Doritos[42]." The relevance here is questionable. Then, too, people like Julia Child and her contributions to French Cuisine and so on would also seemingly be irrelevant. These people may be of Scottish origin, but what do these "other" contributions to other cuisines have to do with Scottish-American cuisine or actual Scottish-origin foods? By the way, author Kay Shaw Nelson mentions most of the points made in this article, which is in her book "The Art of Scottish-American Cooking." Although Nelson is not mentioned here, this Wikipedia article should be more concerned about foodstuffs and recipes than a list of high-profile personal achievements. For example, Nelson also mentions many of these people, but here's what's more noteworthy or relevant in a review of Nelson's book: "recipes including mulligatawny, cheddar cheese pie, Aberdeen Angus Whisky Steaks, salmon dip, split-pea soup, stovies," etc., as well as foods like "Macintosh apples... graham crackers and Angus beef." It's the brands and industrial makers that she also mentions that should not be of concern or mentioned, unless they specifically relate to Scottish Cuisine in America.Ca.papavero (talk) 23:25, 28 June 2012 (UTC)

No, because "Scottish American" isn't synonymous with "Scottish", and it can't be simplified that way, especially after four hundred years. Scottish migrants are distinctive in that they tend to mix as individuals with other cultural groups rather than forming ethnic or religious ghettos, so the emphasis on individual achievement is actually an aspect of their identity. The personal contributors didn't just "happen to be" Scottish American: the fact they were Scottish American made them likely to contribute to culinary history in this exact way. By all means, the section can be expanded by adding more cultural imports direct from Scotland, but it's also important to retain coverage of the traditional role of the Scots in America as cultural brokers between the mainstream and minorities. Lachrie (talk) 13:19, 12 September 2012 (UTC)

Is the infobox picture serious?[edit]

Despite Reese Witherspoon's claim to the ancestry of the Scottish signer of the Declaration of Independence having been disproved[1], she is, at least, the great, great, great, great, great granddaughter of a Scot. A five-times great grandfather is hardly a claim to be a Scottish American! Does that mean that, because my n-times-great grandfather came from Africa, that I should be proud of my African-English heritage? No. 129.234.235.231 (talk) 18:37, 18 April 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ DSDI Staff (2011-12-11). "John Witherspoon - The Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence". USA. Retrieved 2013-02-09. 

25 million scottish-americans?[edit]

How is that possible when the US census say about 5 million people report Scottish ancestry? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.44.203.67 (talk) 20:40, 21 April 2013 (UTC)

Correct. I've edited it. Shoreranger (talk) 16:56, 22 April 2013 (UTC)

Scottish is NOT the same thing as Scots Irish. Full stop.[edit]

This article is making false impressions, at best, and should be edited for tone and content to reflect the difference. Shoreranger (talk) 16:57, 22 April 2013 (UTC)