Talk:Scuttling

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1812[edit]

Shouldn't the Baltimore harbor defense in the war of 1812 be included?

99.148.198.63 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 13:15, 19 June 2011 (UTC).

Untitled[edit]

Should German aircraft carrier Graf Zeppelin be mentioned here? Shawnc 03:55, 29 July 2006 (UTC)

-The fate of the ship is not clear. That most of all concerns the Bismark

Merrimac[edit]

I think USS Merrimac (1898) should also be noted here as a significant act of scuttling. --B.d.mills 01:30, 7 June 2007 (UTC)

As a significant failure, I'd add the 1861 attempt. TREKphiler hit me ♠ 04:29, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

Dive, dive[edit]

I'd add 2 subs, if I could recall the names: 1 RN WW2, which nevertheless lead to her skipper's court-martial, & 1 USN, depth charged to destruction postwar, with her fate recorded by cameras placed aboard. Anybody? TREKphiler hit me ♠ 04:29, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

Don't know the RN sub that was scuttled, but a target ship purposefully destroyed in weapons tests doesn't seem like scuttling to me. I always picture scuttling to be under duress. Binksternet (talk) 15:52, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

Torpedo or ?[edit]

I see an edit that specifies torpedoes as the usual agent of scuttling in naval warfare. What about opening a bunch of valves and hatches from within? Setting time-bomb explosives? Both of these methods have been used as well. Binksternet (talk) 16:13, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

Suggested restructure[edit]

In its current incarnation, the Scutting article, spends a lot more time/space talking about specific instances of scuttling instead of about scuttling. Instead of a laundry list of "notable historical" incidents, I'd like to suggest that the article be restructured around the different reasons to scuttle a ship (avoid capture, blockship, dive wreck, etc), with the individual incidents worked into the prose as examples. -- saberwyn 01:33, 5 November 2010 (UTC)

USS Oriskany[edit]

In this article it is stated that it was scuttled with PCBs on board. In the article on USS Oriskany it states that the PCBs were removed. It would be helpful if someone who knows better would make both articles read the same. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.117.104.254 (talk) 02:29, 28 November 2010 (UTC)

Booby trapped scuttled ships[edit]

The most dangerous problems for salvage were the Brenta which contained a booby trap sunk in one hold made of an armed naval mine sitting on three torpedo warheads and Regia Marina minelayer Ostia which had been sunk by the RAF with all mines still racked.

Please, someone with knowledge of this, include a mention of the resolution of this. I'm dying to know and the article just leaves us all hanging. Comet Tuttle (talk) 21:13, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Ah, I did not realize the article was so unclear. I'll try to make it more obvious.
The booby trap was disarmed very, very carefully and the Brenta was salvaged. The story with all its excitement, anger and drama can be read in US Navy Commander Ellsberg's book Under the Red Sea Sun, a highly recommended non-fiction account which reads like a thriller. (Find it in the nearest library by going here.) The minelayer Ostia, which could hold 80 mines, was salvaged by the Royal Navy's Lieutenant Peter Keeble with the help of US contractor Edison Brown, captain of the tugboat Intent, and his crew. I rather doubt that 80 mines were racked up in the minelayer, as there had recently been a stiffly fought effort to mine Massawa, and scores of mines were placed successfully by the Italians. This discussion forum includes a guy saying there were only "several" mines on the Ostia, and Keeble himself is reported to have disarmed them. Binksternet (talk) 22:46, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Scuttled U-Boots[edit]

There are more than 200 scuttled U-Boots located mostly in the western Baltic and North Sea around Northern Germany and Denmark. The U-Boot scuttling has been omitted from the subject on Scuttling and would a very interesting almost contemporary subject to add. Some questions laying open: Why were the U-Boots scuttled? Why were the U-Boots not retained in a decommissioned state for posterity and examination? What U-Boots were scuttled? There is a detailed examination of U-Boots at UBoot.net. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Eurokanga (talkcontribs) 08:35, 27 May 2013 (UTC)

Most were scuttled in Operation Deadlight. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.7.147.13 (talk) 17:00, 18 November 2013 (UTC)