Talk:Securities fraud

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Law (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon


This article is within the scope of WikiProject Law, an attempt at providing a comprehensive, standardised, pan-jurisdictional and up-to-date resource for the legal field and the subjects encompassed by it.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Finance (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Finance, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles related to Finance on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Investment (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Investment, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Investment on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the importance scale.
 

Elements of the crime[edit]

I'm concerned about a sentence added to the lead not so long ago:

The elements of the crime include theft of capital from investors and defrauding the accounting companies about a corporation's financial reports.

This was added in this edit last September by 24.17.171.84 (talk · contribs · deleted contribs · logs · edit filter log · block user · block log). What concerns me is that elements of a crime is a term of art that seems to have a quite different meaning from the one implied by this usage.

I think it should probably be changed to something like "Examples include theft of capital from investors and defrauding the accounting companies about a corporation's financial reports." --Anticipation of a New Lover's Arrival, The 18:48, 30 March 2008 (UTC)

I agree that this whole artice is FUBAR. I am not sure where to begin. Paranthetically, securities fraud would not include defrauding the accountants but would more likely include fraud by the companies and their officers.--Bassettcat (talk) 18:57, 30 March 2008 (UTC)
I think this is a better definition for the layman. It is the number two hit on google: http://www.lawyershop.com/news/practice-areas/criminal-law/white-collar-crimes/securities-fraud/--Bassettcat (talk) 19:05, 30 March 2008 (UTC)


Adding seciton on types of fraud[edit]

I've begun adding a section on types of securities fraud, borrowing material from other Wiki articles. --Bassettcat (talk) 13:46, 6 April 2008 (UTC)


Question[edit]

Is there not an existing article on the New York Stock Exchange floor trading scandals and, if not, should there be?--Bassettcat (talk) 15:03, 3 May 2008 (UTC)

"Characteristics of victims and perpetrators"[edit]

Hello? Hello? Anyone reading this? Another question: "Characteristics of victims and perpetrators" is an essay and it reads as if it is a synthesis of origial research, and is not really allowed. It has no sourcing. Will anyone get upset if I delete it?--Bassettcat (talk) 17:49, 18 May 2008 (UTC)

Review of reversion of edits made by sockpuppet[edit]

I have reviewed and compared the edits made to this article by User:Bassettcat, now-confirmed sockpuppet of Mantanmoreland, to the version reverted to by User:Pwntjuice following the revelation of the sockpuppetry. The Bassettcat version contains more references and appears to read as a more thorough article. I am not a financial expert, and would appreciate individuals with experience in this field to review the article in detail. I suggest that any questions relating to my action be discussed on this page; I will keep it on my watchlist and will respond to any questions that I can. Risker (talk) 01:58, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

This user is suspected of extensive subtle POV-pushing, just "looking better" isn't good enough - the edits need a much more thorough review than that. --Random832 (contribs) 19:34, 29 May 2008 (UTC)
I don't disagree with you, Random832; unfortunately, I do not have the knowledge base to drill down further. The sourced information agrees with the reference sources, and I have tagged two unreferenced sections. Incidentally, the choice in this case was which subtly-POV version by which sockpuppet to go with, or to completely stub the article, which didn't seem reasonable either. The watches on this series of articles seem to be deterring knowledgeable editors from participating in their editing. I am certainly open to any suggestions you might have. Risker (talk) 19:44, 29 May 2008 (UTC)

Investment fraud based on false claims of inventions or technological breakthroughs[edit]

Where to classify this type of fraud, for example the one perpetrated by Firepower International in Australia, in which a company attracts investors and government grants/tax breaks through falsely claiming to have invented/developed a product/process with huge market potential (in this case a fuel pill)? Strayan (talk) 00:26, 7 August 2008 (UTC)

Unprotection?[edit]

Can this talk page be unprotected now so that unregistered users can make comments? We can quickly restore protection if necessary. --TS 19:12, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

Unprotected, although I have kept the move box ticked. LessHeard vanU (talk) 23:01, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

Criminal or Civil Securities Fraud[edit]

The article refers to "criminal," "crime," and "illegal" throughout but then talks about SEC investigations and government and private lawsuits almost in the same breath. I think the article would be much stronger and more informative if it drew a clearer distinction between the criminal and civil sides of Securities fraud and better characterized the concepts that attend each, such as liability, culpability, the various investigating agencies and their roles, the separate legal avenues taken, and the statutes that govern each. When the SEC sues a company, the settlement or judgment can be paid by the company. But when the DOJ brings criminal charges, who actually gets charged? It's worth considering that the two sides are different enough (despite having the same name and frequently having some overlap in the investigations) that they may be better as two separate Wikipedia articles that each refer to the other in brief to highlight the broad distinctions. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Honus W Scruggs (talkcontribs) 22:38, 3 June 2013 (UTC)