Talk:Semla

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Strawberries or not?[edit]

"In Finland, the bun is sometimes filled with strawberry jam instead of almond paste" The Swedish version says that it's often "hallonsylt" (Raspberry jam). Neither is sourced. Which is correct? Ran4 (talk) 08:52, 22 January 2009 (UTC)

Mandelmassa[edit]

Semlor are usually not eaten with marzipan, but rather with "mandelmassa", a grainier almond paste similar to marzipan, but with a lower sugar content and without artificial food dyes. I'm not sure if replacing "marzipan" in this text with something else would be constructive, though, as I can't seem to find a good word for this in English, and no other article in wikipedia that matches. There doesn't seem to be an established term.

-- 193.11.221.16 19:57, 24 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Just plain "almond paste" should do. It's not any specific variant.
Bo Lindbergh 05:02, 2005 Feb 12 (UTC)
But "almond paste" is usually without sugar. "mandelmassa" is 50% almond and 50% sugar.
marcus 2006 Feb 28 (the Shrove Tuesday!)
But marzipane is only 4-6% almond according to the Wikipedia article on it.Mackan 14:45, 18 July 2006 (UTC)
"Sugared almond paste"? 惑乱 分からん 15:42, 6 November 2006 (UTC)
Why not "almond paste with 50% sugar and 50% almond"? If there's no word for it, just write what it is? 83.254.64.19 (talk) —Preceding comment was added at 12:59, 28 January 2008 (UTC)

Almond paste? Mandelmassa is required to have at least 50% almond content. // Liftarn (talk)

Availability[edit]

"Although the traditional day to consume the semla is Shrove Tuesday, they are nowadays seasonally available from New Year's until the start of Lent."

Shouldn't it be "until the start of Easter"? Sure they must be available all through Lent? (That's at least the time I eat them, but usually home-made)

New picture[edit]

Couldn't somebody living in Sweden try and find a better picture of a semla? The ones you buy at a "conditori" look alot more appetizing, and are also more representational, than the current picture. Mackan 14:37, 18 July 2006 (UTC)

This for example is a pretty good photo: [1] or this [[2]]

Finland-Swedish[edit]

I think that in Finland-Swedish, "semla" refers to another pastry, possibly a sandwich or something like that... 惑乱 分からん 15:42, 6 November 2006 (UTC)

Yes, that is right. It basically means (roughly) a bread roll, probably close to what in rikssvenska would be called a småfranska. 94pjg 21:45, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

What is a WEDG ??? =[edit]

The text "(also known as hetvägg from the german heisse wecken meaning hot wedg)" is very questionable. Apparently it tries to clairfy the origin of the Swedish term "hetvägg", which literally translates to "hot wall". To me it seems that "heisse wecken" <sic> translates to "hot roll", which makes sense considering that a roll is a bun. What is "wedg"? It is not a proper English word. What does "wedg" have to do with Wecken and/or "vägg"? BTW, "wecken" should be capitalized, since it is a German noun, i.e. "heisse Wecken".

Update: I found two good sources and will update the text accordingly:

"Hetvägg is the oldest name, from middle German "hete weggen" = hot wedges or "heisse wecken" = hot buns." http://www.rootsweb.com/~swewgw/Fact/Cult/facCulTrad02.htm http://www.nordiskamuseet.se/makeframeset.asp?sUrl=http%3A//www.nordiskamuseet.se/publication.asp%3Fpublicationid%3D1437&Cat=&catName=&publicationid=1437

—Preceding unsigned comment added by Pnnielsen (talkcontribs) 19:59, 6 November 2007 (UTC) 

Serbia?[edit]

I think the Danish name 'fastelavnsbolle' is not used in Serbia. Maybe Serbia (and Ethiopia?) has been put here by some vandal.82.181.153.142 (talk) 17:24, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

Danish fastelavnsbolle[edit]

The homemade Danish fastelavnsbolle is usually a wheat bun baked with vanillaflavoured custard or jam inside. I have never seen them with raisins etc. and don't know of any Danish recipes for fastelavnsbolle which include those flavors. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.201.2.188 (talk) 17:26, 26 January 2013 (UTC)