Talk:Setaceous Hebrew character

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Some discussion about how this species acquired its extremely odd name would be appreciated. -Toptomcat 01:05, 8 January 2007 (UTC)

Setaceous means "hairy" (although I've never really noticed either adult or larva being particularly hairy) and the Hebrew character bit refers to the pattern on the wing resembling a Hebrew letter (I reckon this is a bit tenuous too). It's a great name though Richard Barlow 13:25, 11 January 2007 (UTC)
PS, the setaceous bit serves mainly to distinguish the species from the similarly marked but not particularly closely related Hebrew Character. Richard Barlow 13:28, 11 January 2007 (UTC)

Evidence for a marked resemblance between the Hebrew letter nun and the moth's marking:

  • Look at the second letter from the right in the fifth word from the right in Monotype's samples of several faces, particularly Peninim. That is a very common book face. [1]
  • By Googling for "Hebrew nun", I found a database of Hebrew letterforms at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences.[2] Several of its high-resolution historical examples of the letter nun (fourth from left in each sample) are practically identical with the moth's marking. [3] For example, the one on the fourth line is from a Passover Haggadah from Prague dated 1527. I haven't explored the copyright issue, but perhaps we could present that image in this article.

--Hoziron 05:34, 19 March 2007 (UTC)