Talk:Sha Na Na

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Untitled[edit]

Robert Leonard is actually a professor in the College of Humanities at San Francisco State University and has been teching there for the past 20 years, I know because I'm taking class of his titled "Humanism and Mysticism" as I'm typing this, so I will change his info. Jack Stephens 02:38, 2 September 2006 (UTC)

The link to Alan Cooper was incorrect--the wrong Alan Cooper. The Alan Cooper who was an original member of Sha-Na-Na is a professor of Bible at Jewish Theological Seminary (see http://www.jtsa.edu/progs/bib/alcooper/index.shtml). I have made the correction [user:ulyssesmsu, 7 October 2006].

This appears to be the same Sha Na Na as in the 1977-1981 TV series. Recommend a new Section to this article on the TV show (no need for a separate article). - B.C.Schmerker 13:06, 7 May 2007 (UTC)

I noticed that Lennie Baker's and Donny York's names were deleted from the list of SNN members, and I'm wondering why. As two members that appeared on the series, they are better known than some of the others. LoriM5160 (talk) 22:33, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

I will suggest that we split this section into three: Original members, former members and present members. --Joergen (talk) 08:10, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Move Back?[edit]

The recent move of this page from Sha Na Na to Na Na Na appears to be grossly incorrect. 74.10.73.253 (talk) 20:32, 14 April 2008 (UTC)

Jack Stephens: You're thinking George Leonard...Who has a link at the bottom of the main entry. Rob Leonard was the lead vocalist. However, aside from the article reprint on his own site and his personal claims in classes, I can't find hard evidence linking him to the band. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.109.112.13 (talk) 18:44, 16 June 2008 (UTC)

George Leonard is credited with "Conception and Choreography" on the 1969 album cover. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Klmty (talkcontribs) 08:59, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Mike Brown[edit]

Sax player Mike Brown sometimes fills in as an anchor on KPVT-LP in Pahrump, NV. It's also where he lives with his twin brother. Apple8800 (talk) 17:02, 30 October 2010 (UTC)

GEORGE LEONARD/ ROBERT LEONARD QUESTION[edit]

Judging by comments above, some of this article's confusion may have resulted from a quiet tug of war between George Leonard's students and Robert Leonard's students. (Both are college professors.) There was no need for this. The brothers have published articles together about Sha Na Na and are currently collaborating on a musical. George Leonard is credited with "conception and choreography" of Sha Na Na on the first album. Robert Leonard was the group's first president, a gold lame lead singer, most famous for his Teen Angel, recently re-released by Bill Graham's website, Wolfgang's Vault. Rob was the singer, George had studied choreography at the Butleroff School with Boris Butleroff, a Balanchine dancer. As Rob told John Regardie in a 2002 interview for Maxim Blender, "My brother, George, who was also a student at Columbia University in New York at the tie— this was all his idea." There's no tension between the brothers. Robert has that article posted on his website about Sha Na Na: ROBERT A. LEONARD, Ph.D. George and Robert appeared onstage together at the 40th Anniversary Grease Festival at Hofstra College, Long Island, 2010, which reunited them with original performers Elliot Cahn, Dave Garrett with the existing group, helmed by Jocko Marcellino, Donny York and Scott Simon. 67.116.253.0 (talk) 00:39, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

INVENTING THE FIFTIES— call for updates to article[edit]

The Sha Na Na article has become incomplete and should be updated. You Tube has revived them in the last two years. Some of their songs have well over a million views. There is much literature out there to quote from, for serious musicologists who want to improve this article. There has been a revival of interest in Sha Na Na in recent years among historians for two reasons. Woodstock, instead of dying away, has become legendary. Second, historians have been showing that the concept of the Greasy "Fifties" which Grease and Happy Days later depended on, started with Sha Na Na in 1969, with their first concert, THE GLORY THAT WAS GREASE and their FIRST EAST COAST GREASE FESTIVAL. Simon Reynolds spends four pages on it in Retromania (August, 2011). Amazon.com: Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to Its Own Past (9780865479944): Simon Reynolds: Books Sha Na Na was all over the Atlantic Monthly this month, October 2011. Everything Old - Magazine - The Atlantic Here is James Parker, summarizing Reynolds on Sha Na Na:

"Burrowing backward in search of retro’s first cause, Reynolds traces the reactionary roots of punk rock—its claim to be rescuing rock and roll from the bloatations of the early ’70s. Jerry Nolan, drummer for our friends the New York Dolls, claimed the band was “bringing back the magic of the fifties!” Was that the beginning of the “Rift of Retro”? It was not. Posterity may regard as the highlight of Michael Wadleigh’s 1970 documentary Woodstock not the health warning about the brown acid, but the spectacle of Sha Na Na doing “At the Hop.” This crew, at the preeminent ’60s event, surrounded by wobbly idols and dazed wielders of the zeitgeist, were shamanistically retro. Sha Na Na channeled the ’50s by overdoing them, performing cover versions—as George Leonard, the band’s brain, tells Reynolds—at “twice the speed of the originals: I insisted we do the music the way it was remembered instead of the way it was.” The singers wore gold lamé; they bopped and jived absurdly, like celebrants of a forgotten rite. They, not Jefferson Airplane, were the future, by which I mean, of course, the past. The irony that their early-morning set came right before Jimi Hendrix “immolating”—Reynolds’s word—“The Star-Spangled Banner” is almost too exquisite to bear."

So the article should be updated to accommodate Sha Na Na's return, and its new prestige. 67.116.253.0 (talk) 00:40, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

Scott Simon[edit]

The third paragraph says that Simon is from the TV show. Actually he joined years before the TV show, before the second album. In fact, I think he performed at Woodstock, but I'm not sure. Bubba73 You talkin' to me? 23:25, 30 November 2012 (UTC)