Talk:Shanghai–Nanjing Intercity Railway

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Shanghai–Nanjing HSR vs Beijing-Shanghai HSR[edit]

Is this a section of the in-progress Beijing-Shanghai HSR or an entirely separate line? The article should probably indicate if the former.

Willhsmit (talk) 23:22, 1 July 2010 (UTC)

It's an entirely separate line. Python eggs (talk) 00:37, 3 July 2010 (UTC)
Right... at some point in the past I had misunderstood the description of the two lines as, indeed, being "combined", but I was obviously wrong. Here's an article, 关于京沪高速铁路与沪宁城际铁路昆山段具体走向及站点设置的说明, with a detailed map which shows how the three systems - the Shanghai–Nanjing HSR (blue), the future Beijing-Shanghai HSR (red), and the "old" Shanghai-Nanjing line (yellow) are all aligned within the city of Kunshan (where about 30 km of the system is located). While the two new systems have very similar track alignments, they are not always identical - so that certainly implies different sets of tracks. Perhaps the designers wanted separate systems of tracks because the Shanghai-Najing trains have a lot more stations, and make a lot more stops, than the Beijing-Shanghai trains on the same section - and they would not be satisfied with just having passing sidings at stations, as more conventional railways do. -- Vmenkov (talk) 10:27, 22 July 2010 (UTC)
The main reason is because the Shanghai-Nanjing line is mostly constructed just next to the old line (except Kunshan-Shanghai section, which is next to the Beijing-Shanghai line) to reduce the demolition cost. Even though the old line was constructed under a high standard back in 1900s, but the railway curve radius does not fulfill the requirement of very high speed running. That's why there is only 15 km long section of the whole line capable for 350 km/h running, and these 350 km/h sections are all found between Kunshan and Shanghai. Here's a map: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=60119063&postcount=2805 This intercity line uses old stations in city centers, while Beijing-Shanghai uses new constructed stations that very far away from urban area. Python eggs (talk) 14:58, 22 July 2010 (UTC)
Thanks a lot for that map, and your comment; they finally put the question to rest! We really need a link to a map like that from this article (as well as from the Beijing-Shaghai HSR article). Vmenkov (talk) 22:57, 22 July 2010 (UTC)

Criticism[edit]

Do we need a "Criticism" section? It seems that with the opening of the new Huning Gaotie, it became practically impossible to travel in the Shanghai-Nanjing corridor on any of the less expensive "older" services: either the regular K/T/no-letter trains, or the fast D trains (which themselves were introduced only a few years ago). From what I have seen, it appears that hardly any D trains from Shanghai terminate in Nanjing anymore; and even though D trains running from Shanghai via Nanjing to points beyond (such as Hefei or Wuhan or Beijing) may often have some spare capacity on the Shanghai-to-Nanjing sections, ticket office won't sell such tickets, and will tell customers to buy a ticket on a (more expensive) G train running on the new line. Same goes for K etc. trains. The difference between the Y146 Shanghai-Nanjing ticket for a G train, and a Y80-90 D train ticket, or a Y50 K-train ticket may be trivial to an upper-middle class professional or a foreign tourist; but for someone who earns Y1000-1500 a month (seems to be a typical wage level e.g. in the service sector) it may mean the difference between being able to afford to visit one's family every weekend or only once a month.

Of course, G trains are about 1.5 times as fast as the D train, and 3-4 times as fast as "regular" trains; but for traveling shorter distance (say, Nanjing to Zhenjiang) the time saving is not very significant comparing to the overall time cost of buying the ticket, navigating the (huge) train stations, and waiting for the train.

I am pretty sure local newspapers have raised the issue, so sources can be found. -- Vmenkov (talk) 23:17, 25 February 2011 (UTC)

Everything above should be considered carefully and should be independently verified. While I feel mainstream media and those so called "experts" have virtually no public credibility on this topic. They don't even check the timetable before writing something against high-speed rail. But... Here per Wikipedia's policy, this "encyclopedia" doesn't care about the fact, here only cares whether you have "cited a source". It is bad. Python eggs (talk) 02:39, 26 February 2011 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: page moved. Vegaswikian (talk) 00:05, 11 March 2012 (UTC)



Shanghai–Nanjing Intercity High-Speed RailwayShanghai–Nanjing Intercity Railway – To keep all of the intercity railway articles consistent. For example, see Beijing–Tianjin Intercity Railway and Nanjing–Anqing Intercity Railway. Adding the words "High-Speed" is redundant.  –Nav  talk to me or sign my guestbook 14:24, 3 March 2012 (UTC)

  • Comment there are low-speed and high-speed passenger rail in China, so why is "high-speed" redundant? 70.24.251.71 (talk) 05:26, 4 March 2012 (UTC)
    • Yes, there is low-speed and high-speed passenger rail, but I think using the term intercity and high-speed is redundant, since all (or most?) intercity rail in China is considered high-speed. Also, notice that many Chinese news sources (such as [1] and [2], the second in particular showing a large banner) read "沪宁城际铁路" (Shanghai–Nanjing Intercity Railway), instead of 沪宁城际高速铁路.  –Nav  talk to me or sign my guestbook 14:26, 4 March 2012 (UTC)
      • intercity means service between cities. The highspeed PDLs are relatively new, many cities are connected only by lowspeed passenger service. Highspeed lines are relatively rare, even if they are being built at a ferocious pace. 70.24.251.71 (talk) 09:54, 5 March 2012 (UTC)
  • Support: intercity implies high-speed. --Zanhe (talk) 07:48, 7 March 2012 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.