Talk:Shinran

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Term 'Shonin'[edit]

'Shonin' can be written 聖人, 圣人 or 上人. 聖人 means an enlightened being (sage) and is rarely used, 上人 means an 'excellent' or 'superior' person and is much more common. Shinran is termed 聖人 or 圣人 whilst the subsequent leaders of the Jodo Shinshu tradition are termed 上人.

Eshinni[edit]

She has not been mentioned in the article by now. [1] Here it is said:

Eshinni (1182-1268?), a Buddhist nun and the wife of Shinran (1173-1262), the celebrated founder of the True Pure Land, or Shin, school of Buddhism, was largely unknown until the discovery of a collection of her letters in 1921. In this study, James C. Dobbins, a leading scholar of Pure Land Buddhism, has made creative use of these letters to shed new light on life and religion in medieval Japan. He provides a complete translation of the letters and an explication of them that reveals the character and flavor of early Shin Buddhism. Readers will come away with a new perspective on Pure Land scholarship and a vivid image of Eshinni and the world in which she lived. After situating the ideas and practices of Pure Land Buddhism in the context of the actual living conditions of thirteenth-century Japan, Dobbins examines the portrayal of women in Pure Land Buddhism, the great range of lifestyles found among medieval women and nuns, and how they constructed a meaningful religious life amid negative stereotypes. He goes on to analyze aspects of medieval religion that have been omitted in our modern-day account of Pure Land and tries to reconstruct the religious assumptions of Eshinni and Shinran in their own day. A prevailing theme that runs throughout the book is the need to look beyond idealized images of Buddhism found in doctrine to discover the religion as it was lived and practiced. Scholars and students of Buddhism, Japanese history, women's studies, and religious studies will find much in this engaging work that is thought-provoking and insightful."

Now it's 2008 according to gregorian calendar, we can mention her in wikipedia. Can we not?

Austerlitz -- 88.75.70.231 (talk) 16:46, 20 February 2008 (UTC)

oh, so sorry, she has been mentioned already!

Austerlitz -- 88.75.70.231 (talk) 16:47, 20 February 2008 (UTC)

Review, part of quote: "Eshinni (1182-1268?) was both nun and wife as well as spiritual partner of the priest Shinran (1173-1262)."

Ashes of Shinran Shonin[edit]

Reported as being found in March 2008. Shouldn't that be 'what is thought to be the ash remains of Shinran Shonin ....' How the heck would they know for sure. (I don't read Japanese so can't comment on the references.) —Preceding unsigned comment added by RegentsPark (talkcontribs) 01:49, 25 March 2008 (UTC)

Let's call it assumed. Can someone provide an English language cite for this article?--RegentsPark (talk) 21:44, 25 March 2008 (UTC)

I agree. Apart from anything it is common to split up remains in Japan and there are other relics that are said to contain some of his ashes. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Nio-guardian (talkcontribs) 13:40, 26 March 2008 (UTC)