Talk:Siberian Traps

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Volcanoes (Rated Start-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Volcanoes, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of volcanoes, volcanology, igneous petrology, and related subjects on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Geology (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon Siberian Traps is part of WikiProject Geology, an attempt at creating a standardized, informative, comprehensive and easy-to-use geology resource. If you would like to participate, you can choose to edit this article, or visit the project page for more information.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Russia / Physical geography (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Russia, a WikiProject dedicated to coverage of Russia on Wikipedia.
To participate: Feel free to edit the article attached to this page, join up at the project page, or contribute to the project discussion.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the physical geography of Russia task force.
 

Note on Numbers[edit]

I changed the numbers to all be done in text ("5 million"). Previously some were done in scientific notation (5 x 106) and some in text. Either is okay but it should be done consistently. Jdorje

What?[edit]

I had no idea what these things were, so I looked them up here. Unfortunately, this article did really clarify anything for me. Maybe this article should start off with a simple explanation of Siberian Traps and then delve into details.

When did it occur[edit]

the article does directly say the estimated date of occurrence. it only references the Permian extinction. 64.111.137.238 00:42, 8 January 2007 (UTC)

Added timing. Cheers Geologyguy 00:45, 8 January 2007 (UTC)

The first item that should greet the viewer is a map of Permian Pangaea. 250 million years ago, Pangaea was a single land mass that stretched from north to south--almost from pole to pole and maybe a third as wide as Planet Earth. A map of Pangaea should be available; hate to believe one is not in the public domain. Perhaps the map on Wikipedia 'Pangaea' can be copied to here. Also, the reader should be made aware that weather was more tropical then than it is today.

Interestingly, the Siberian Traps are in the same general location now as they were 250 million years ago.

City College of San Francisco has an excellent overview of "Flood Basalt Extinctions." The Geological Society of America Bulletin November/December 2006 has an article with a map of Permian Pangaea: "Middle-Late Permian Extinction on Land" by Gregory J. Retallick, et.al.

The High School Student who engages Wikipedia should be immediately aware that Planet Earth looked very different 250 million years ago than it does today. In this day of concern over global warming, the student should learn soon that Planet Earth has gone through many climactic changes in the course of its 4.6 billion year existence. When the History Channel can present this topic with such lucidity--"The Great Dying"--then the printed page, Wikipedia, should be equally lucid, accurate, and thorough.StevenJTorrey (talk) 19:42, 13 December 2009 (UTC)

Include a map of Permian Pangaea[edit]

The first item that should greet the viewer is a map of Permian Pangaea. 250 million years ago, Pangaea was a single land mass that stretched from north to south--almost from pole to pole and maybe one-third as wide as planet Earth. A map of Pangaea should be available; hate to believe one is not in the public domain. Perhaps the map on Wikipedia 'Pangaea' can be copied here. Also, the reader should be made aware that weather was more tropical then than it is today.

Interestingly, the Siberian Traps are in the same general location now as they were 250 million years ago.

City College of San Francisco has an excellent overview of "Flood Basalt Extinctons." The Geological Society of America Bulletin November/December 2006 has an article with a map of Permian Pangaea: "Middle-Late Permian Extinction on Land" by Gregory J. Retallick, et. al.

The High School student who engages Wikipedia should be immediately aware that Planet Earth looked very different 250 million years ago than it does today. In this day of concern over global warming, the student should learn that Planet Earth has gone through many climactic changes in the course of its 4.6 billion year existence. When History Channel can present this topic with such lucidity--"The Great Dying"--then the printed page, Wikipedia, should be equally lucid, accurate, and thorough.StevenJTorrey (talk) 05:46, 14 December 2009 (UTC)

I'm not convinced that climate change is all that relevant to this article's topic (which is the Traps themselves, not the Great Dying). I have added a map of Pangaea, though. -- Avenue (talk) 07:39, 14 December 2009 (UTC)
About 250 Ma, Siberia was pivoting clockwise, so that Siberia's northern & eastern coastlines were trending southwards (towards north-trending China). That pivoting plausibly involved extensional stress, thru the Siberian plate, between its boundary with Baltica, at the Urals, in the west; and its opposite ocean shores. Such extension, and resulting crustal thinning, could account for the Siberian Traps flood basalts eruptions. Meanwhile, about the same time, north China was apparently trending northwards, onto collision course with southwards spinning Siberia. Again, if north China was being pulled northwards, then extensional stresses, and crustal thinning could have occurred, accounting for the Emeishan Traps eruptions. The main map provided in the article, of the Permian period, does suggest water-ways extending into Siberia, east of the Urals; and in between north & south China. Tectonic forces, pulling Siberia south, and north China north, could have caused crustal thinning, resulting in flood basalt eruptions. 66.235.38.214 (talk) 08:07, 21 October 2012 (UTC)

Expansion[edit]

I stumbled on this page a few moments ago and, through further research, have found extensive materials in several reputable databases, primarily JSTOR. I am not, however, an authority on the subject and would not feel comfortable expanding this article or otherwise integrating my findings. If anyone here has some expertise in geology, or this specific location and events pertaining to it, but does not have university or other access to these data, I would be more than happy to supply such materials as necessary.

I've included several citations, including stable links to excerpts, available to non-subscribers. Please feel free to contact me for more information.
- Johnny$Galt (talk) 05:18, 17 December 2009 (UTC)

Citations:

"Rapid Eruption of the Siberian Traps Flood Basalts at the Permo-Triassic Boundary" Paul R. Renne, Asish R. Basu Science, New Series, Vol. 253, No. 5016 (Jul. 12, 1991), pp. 176-179 Published by: American Association for the Advancement of Science Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2878695

"Synchronism of the Siberian Traps and the Permian-Triassic Boundary" I. H. Campbell, G. K. Czamanske, V. A. Fedorenko, R. I. Hill, V. Stepanov Science, New Series, Vol. 258, No. 5089 (Dec. 11, 1992), pp. 1760-1763 Published by: American Association for the Advancement of Science Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2880374

"Synchrony and Causal Relations Between Permian-Triassic Boundary Crises and Siberian Flood Volcanism" Paul R. Renne, Zhang Zichao, Mark A. Richards, Michael T. Black, Asis R. Basu Science, New Series, Vol. 269, No. 5229 (Sep. 8, 1995), pp. 1413-1416 Published by: American Association for the Advancement of Science Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2888725


Range[edit]

Does it extend underwater? 99.236.221.124 (talk) 17:10, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

The traps are known to occur along part of the coasts of both the Kara and Laptev Seas, so a subsea continuation in these areas is very likely. Mikenorton (talk) 17:34, 3 February 2010 (UTC)
Thanks, just asking because I don't see it on the map. Also, do you know the composition of the country rock in the area? The article isn't clear on that and my textbook barely mentions basalt. 99.236.221.124 (talk) 20:23, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

Does the word "traps" come from Dutch or Swedish?[edit]

This article contains the following sentence:

"The term 'traps' is derived from the Swedish word for stairs (trappa, or sometimes trapp), referring to the step-like hills forming the landscape of the region."

However, the related article about the Deccan Traps has this sentence:

"The term 'trap', used in geology for such rock formations, is derived from the Dutch word for stairs, [1] referring to the step-like hills forming the landscape of the region." [1] The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, Clarendon Press, 1993

Unfortunately, I do not know Dutch or Swedish, so I would not presume to correct this discrepancy.

24.21.73.250 (talk) 08:32, 23 March 2010 (UTC)

Is it important to know? Dutch and Swedish are Germanic languages of the Indo-European languages, and neighbours. Quote I from Deccan Traps discussion: ":da:Trappe, de:Treppe, nl:Trap, no:Trapp, sv:Trappa. According to my sources it is a Scandinavian word for Stairway. --Jo (talk) 21:35, 10 September 2008 (UTC)" Quote II: "My german geological dictionary says that it is derived from a swedish miner's word (Hans Murawski: Geologisches Wörterbuch. 11. ed. Ferd. Emke Verlag, Stuttgart 2004, ISBN 978-3-827-41445-8). --Jo (talk) 20:03, 16 September 2008 (UTC)" So Avenue is right, thx ;) I still think this old word has similar pronunciation in most germanic languages, so it could be an illusion to say it is from one specific germanic language. --Chris.urs-o (talk) 08:50, 23 March 2010 (UTC)
Maybe it's not that important. But for what it's worth, the consensus among the etymologies listed here seems to be that it came from Swedish. Knowing Swedish or Dutch won't help you here; what matters is how the word first entered English. -- Avenue (talk) 13:24, 23 March 2010 (UTC)

- 'Trapp' is a Norwegian and Danish word as well. If there's no particular reason why the article says it's a Swedish word, the article might as well say it's a Germanic word or something. I mean think about it, why Swedish? Sweden don't even share borders with Russia, while Norway do. --46.9.240.116 (talk) 20:56, 14 January 2012 (UTC)

Who discovered traps?[edit]

It is widely recognised that Polish geologist Aleksander Czekanowski (Chekanovsky) discovered the Siberian Traps during his expeditions to northern and eastern Siberia in the 1870’s. - please add it Source: http://www.le.ac.uk/gl/ads/SiberianTraps/History%20of%20Research.htm — Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.150.156.163 (talk) 17:14, 15 June 2011 (UTC)

related to antarctic meteor?[edit]

link back to Wilkes Land Crater which links here? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.87.130.113 (talk) 06:14, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

Impact on prehistoric life[edit]

The "Impact on prehistoric life" section consists almost entirely of a description of the Permian/Triassic extinction event and its aftermath, and virtually nothing about HOW the Siberian Traps may have caused or contributed to that event. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 160.111.254.17 (talk) 19:42, 29 August 2013 (UTC)