Talk:Silver cord

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Hello! My name is Regine, a student from University of Toronto Mississauga, and I would like to contribute and make some changes in this article as part of accomplishing an assignment in one the subjects that I am taking. Please do not hesitate to comment or raise some questions if the ideas that I will present are unclear or doubtful. Thank you very much Waw(o,o)ng (talk) 01:00, 1 April 2013 (UTC)


Without rejecting 'occult' interpretations of Ecclesiastes Ch. 12, perhaps the Geneva version sidenotes explaining all the terms in this obscure passage should be accorded some weight. It seems certain that the physical body is under discussion, and thus the 'silver cord' may well refer to the shining white marrow of the spinal cord, and the 'golden bowl' to the skull, or to the hue of the delicate golden dura mater and pia mater which cover it. Rupture of any of these is likely to be fatal. Admittedly, the rest of the passage describes old age, not trauma. And of course it is possible that the whole can be read at more than one level. The 'wheel broken at the cistern' is named as the heart in the Geneva version, which seems to anticipate William Harvey's discovery of the circulation by the author, and in print from 1560. But the 'occult' meanings were first suggested some centuries later, and should be treated with some degree of caution.222.153.80.86 (talk) 10:15, 3 July 2009 (UTC)


I dont know if this should be added into the article but the Stephen King book "Insomnia" talks about these Silver Chords also I believe —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.254.252.163 (talk) 20:26, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

French version of this article[edit]

Just randomly remarking that there's a fair bit more material including references in the French version... : http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Ffr.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FCordon_d%2527argent&sl=fr&tl=en K2709 (talk) 21:49, 11 March 2010 (UTC)