Talk:Sliced bread

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Sliced Bread / The Greatest Thing Since...[edit]

I don't think these two should be separate articles but currently they each have their own article. Both articles are pretty short and I think they should be MERGED. No one would look up sliced bread for any other reason than curiosity about the phrase. It is odd that no mention of the phrase was made in the sliced bread article (although there was a link to the greatest thing since... article). I added a shortened version of the greatest thing since... article to the sliced article. Does anyone agree or disagree with me? Any good reason for having two separate, short articles as currently the case?

Sliced bread Greatest thing since sliced bread

--Jon in California 9 September 2007

I'd like to see a citation for when bread was first wrapped, given the quote in the original sliced bread advertisement.

--Peter — Preceding unsigned comment added by Peter Raymond (talkcontribs) 20:24, 9 April 2013 (UTC)

See[edit]

"Considerable research was made in order to arrive at a thickness of slice which would enjoy the widest possible public acceptance and it was decided that a slice slightly less than one half of an inch would be the most suitable. The fact that the slices of this improved product are so perfect will be especially pleasing to women who take pride in the technique of their table service (Constitution-Tribune 1928)." bobrowstrain1.pdfBunchofgrapes (talk) 22:05, 6 September 2006 (UTC)

[1] Maybe an OK source for the Battle Creek controversy.


This article on sliced bread is the best thing since sliced bread.

Repeatedly vandalizing this article on sliced bread is NOT the best thing since sliced bread. Please stop.

Not signing your posts on the discussion page of the article on slice bread is not the best thing since sliced bread. Craig Ponnan 00:54, 14 January 2007 (UTC)


Add thickness by country[edit]

Sliced bread thickness seems to differ from one country to another. Is it possible to have a list? From my own experience, in Canada it's usually 10mm thick, less in Belgium, in Japan it's about 20mm, and in New Zealand it's really thin with 5mm. --69.51.192.165 (talk) 18:19, 21 July 2008 (UTC)


"America's entry into World War II prompted a ban on sliced bread starting in January 1943."[edit]

This would be more helpful if the article actually said when the ban ended! 86.132.143.1 03:17, 18 May 2007 (UTC)

At then end of the war maybe. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.123.78.75 (talk) 05:29, 26 April 2008 (UTC)

other issues[edit]

Can anyone find out the first recorded use of this phrase? -- BD2412 thimk 16:32, 2005 May 2 (UTC)

I know it would be wrong, but can we please get this to redirect to something arbitrary? Marm 07:38, 11 April 2006 (UTC)

Does this really need an image? And if so, couldn't it have a more serious caption?

YES we need the immage as it records the origin of this popular phrase. It should be included in the MERGED article of sliced bread / greatest thing since...
--Jon in California 10 September 2007


Criticism[edit]

In many countries of Europe the (pre)-sliced bread is not considered a great invention, sometimes it is seen as sacrilegous (against Jesus, who distributed the bread to the 12). People also argue sliced bread becomes tainted much sooner than uncut one.

It's a lucky thing no one cares. --UtarEmpire 11:55, 10 August 2006 (UTC)
Actually, I agree. Sliced bread have a bad reputation and are only used for toast. And you don't eat toast every day.
Yes, it's a terrible invention. I'd use the phrase "best thing since sliced bread" only in sarcasm. Either it dries out, or if it is improperly packed (which it usually is) then it tastes like wet handkerchiefs. Plus, for the "soylent gray" products sold in super-markets: I'd seriously doubt that it is sliced (or even baked) at all. I think it's pressed in shape, and has never seen the inside of an oven.

Popcultural references[edit]

"Imitation of Life" by R.E.M. ("...the greatest thing since bread came sliced") should be mentioned. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 83.236.128.138 (talk) 17:16, 24 April 2007 (UTC).

It should be noted that Betty White is older that sliced bread. TekBoi [Ali Kilinc] (talk) 00:59, 25 March 2014 (UTC)

Sliced Bread / The Greatest Thing Since...[edit]

I don't think these two should be separate articles but currently they each have their own article. Both articles are pretty short and I think they should be MERGED. No one would look up sliced bread for any other reason than curiosity about the phrase. It is odd that no mention of the phrase was made in the sliced bread article (although there was a link to the greatest thing since... article). I added a shortened version of the greatest thing since... article to the sliced article. Does anyone agree or disagree with me? Any good reason for having two separate, short articles as currently the case?

Sliced bread / Greatest thing since sliced bread

--Jon in California 9 September 2007 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.127.73.82 (talk) 07:21, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

Upon review of both articles, I have no objection to such a merger. Cheers! bd2412 T 17:27, 10 September 2007 (UTC)
If I hear no objections within the next few days, I'll carry out the proposed merge. Cheers! bd2412 T 01:52, 13 September 2007 (UTC)
Cool! We should also include that small picture from the 1940s to show the first use of the phrase. Its origin is important. (Someone has removed it from this article now, find it in the reverts). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.127.73.82 (talk) 02:50, 13 September 2007 (UTC)
No, that was not the first use of the phrase. Also, before a merger is done, try adding merger tags first. --Strothra 02:59, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

References[edit]

Simply putting "Wenske" (and other similar names) as a reference really isn't good enough. Does anyone actually know what these references refer to, and if so, could someone please expand on them using cite tags? Thanks. mattbuck 22:03, 28 October 2007 (UTC)

  • It appears that all of the references are listed under "Notes". bd2412 T 01:43, 29 October 2007 (UTC)
    • Fixed. bd2412 T 01:47, 29 October 2007 (UTC)
Ah, excellent, thankyou. mattbuck 08:11, 29 October 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 10:04, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Globalize[edit]

I added the tag {{globalize/USA}} because this article assumes a purely United States context where the reader is already familiar with many aspects of sliced bread. But this article says nothing about sliced bread in other countries, and does not describe the common dimensions (width, height, thickness) of bread slices, etc., for people who are unfamiliar with it. It needs to be globalized. - Gilgamesh (talk) 20:40, 6 November 2009 (UTC)

You don't think that the image in the lead will give them a hint? WhatamIdoing (talk) 23:56, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

Broken footnote link[edit]

The first footnote goes to a page not found. This footnote should be fixed. Odoyle42 (talk) 23:04, 14 April 2010 (UTC)

That link appears to be unrecoverable (not in Wayback Machine or Google cache).
However, the Image in question is here. I'm not sure if the image itself should be used as a source, or the 1928 article they've republished, or both. I have no time to investigate further. Hopefully someone else can decide, and fix. :) -- Quiddity (talk) 00:50, 15 April 2010 (UTC)

Soft bread and slicing[edit]

Article claims:

Pre-sliced bread was largely necessitated as a result of the demand for the texture of the new industrial breads, which were difficult to slice at home.

(this is a shortened version of a longer, more opinionated text...). This might be plausible, except that soft bread had been around long before 1928. For example, "The British expect bread to be white, well risen, and soft, an expectation that developed in the mid-nineteenth century..." (my emphasis).[2] The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook (Fannie Farmer, 1894) has many recipes for home-made soft breads including sugar, fat, etc.[3]--Macrakis (talk) 17:22, 9 January 2012 (UTC)

Having seen no rebuttal to the above after 3+ months, I am removing the claim. --Macrakis (talk) 01:55, 25 April 2012 (UTC)

U.S. Sliced Bread thickness...[edit]

I don't have the faintest idea why there's a reference to "Texas Toast" in the U.S. portion of the "Around the World" section of the page. That should be omitted, or at least changed to something other than frozen dinner bread as the American's standard for "sliced bread." I don't know of any United States citizen who would say that Texas Toast makes or symbolizes the standard thickness (or style) of American sliced bread. Would anyone want to change this to something more accurate? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2601:4:1380:290:6007:7D81:D4B7:E1A2 (talk) 06:19, 12 January 2014 (UTC)