Talk:Slip jig

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Dance (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Dance, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Dance and Dance-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Irish music (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Irish music, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Irish music on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Counting[edit]

As a reader of the article I'm confused by the counting. It seems that that pattern of counting would not yield 9 beats to the bar. Can someone amend the text to explain this a bit better? -- cmh 04:37, 23 June 2006 (UTC)

In 9/8 time, the 9 indicates the number of beats in a measure, while the 8 indicates the value of the beat; in this case, an eighth note. Therefore, in 9/8 time, there are the equivalent of 9 eighth notes possible within a given measure. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.90.93.10 (talkcontribs) 11:58, 29 August 2006 (UTC)
I'll try to do this graphically in text: 1 x 2 3 x 4 5 x x Each number is one of the beats counted by a dancer, while the 'x's are eighth notes which aren't counted as beats. Look at the chorus for the song Rocky Road to Dublin. The tune is a 9/8 tune; the "One, two three, four five" are the five beats. The words "one" and "three" are quarter notes, "two" and "four" are eighth notes, and "five" a dotted-quarter note. Argyriou 21:20, 29 August 2006 (UTC)

Gender[edit]

I've never seen a guy compete in slip jig . . . Crayoncandy 18:08, 19 October 2006 (UTC)

Come to the East Bay Feis this weekend. I'm too old to be considered a "boy", but I'm competing in slip jig friday evening. Argyriou 01:29, 20 October 2006 (UTC)


Actually, over many years of dancing myself, I've been told by a number of long-time dancers that slip-jigs (also known as 'hop-jigs') used to be exclusively danced by men. Then, after WWII it shifted over to mostly women, and now it can be part of anyone's dance repertoire. The page at [1] hints at 1950 for a transition time and may be citing Frank Whelan's 'The Complete Guide To Irish Dance'.. I can't find my copy to verify. Also, at [2] a writer makes a recollection that men used to dance slip-jigs. Perhaps it's for this reason of uneven gender balance that slip-jigs do not appear in social set or ceili dances, except for the Sionna Set recently choreagraphed by Dr. Catherine Foley for performance purposes. CSProfBill (talk) 23:52, 1 November 2008 (UTC)

Non-encyclopedic style[edit]

The paragraph beginning "Although the previous paragraph states the Slip Jig was originally performed..." is very inappropriate in its style, especially in its second half. It needs to be either thoroughly redone or deleted. There also needs to be some sort of templated alert to that effect with the paragraph itself. Unfortunately, I don't know how to do this, and the makeshifts I have sometimes resorted to in the past tend to make more practised editors ratty with me. Koro Neil (talk) 23:55, 4 March 2014 (UTC)