Talk:Snow pea

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Name origin[edit]

The text gives two speculations why it is called snow pea. Here is an alternative one that pops out when I was trying to explain to my curious-about-anything-and-everything kindergartener why it was so called: when eaten stir-fried, it sounds "crunch, crunch" just like walking on snow. --Minimeme (talk) 16:11, 27 January 2009 (UTC)

Oh dear - here we go again with an American View rather than a World View: The assumption is made that "Snow Pea" is the World-English definition and that Mange Tout is subordinate. In the UK and most other English-speaking countries, this vegetable is known as Mange Tout. --621PWC (talk) 15:49, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

Perhaps the best way to title the article is to use the Latin name (for example, look at the article headed "Vicia faba" - which looks after "fava beans" for Americans and "broad beans" for most other English-speaking countries. --621PWC (talk) 16:35, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

Why has this article been renamed "Snow Pea"?! Noone in the UK (or France) have heard of this, it isn't in the language. The article should revert to "mange tout" which everyone recognises. And the suggestion of using the Latin name for an item that people need to search for is even less helpful (in my opinion). Can it PLEASE be changed back or be called "Mange Tout / Snow Pea" Applet (talk) 22:07, 31 May 2010 (UTC)

What is particularly annoying about this example of American world view, is that (sadly) in America snow peas/mange-tout are very rarely offered in restaurants, whereas in the UK and Europe it is a very common accompaniment. So even though this is a minority vegetable in America, the rest of us still have to be subject to the American preference having seniority. Exasperating!--621PWC (talk) 19:21, 23 July 2014 (UTC)

As in all things. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 131.215.115.31 (talk) 21:43, 6 August 2014 (UTC)

added Mange Tout (disambiguation)[edit]

This should fix the confusion.

Micklweiss (talk) 04:20, 7 December 2011 (UTC)

There is no confusion, just resignation that, as always, the American World View prevails in Wikipedia. --621PWC (talk) 19:21, 23 July 2014 (UTC)