Talk:Sonic weapon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Military history (Rated Start-Class)
MILHIST This article is within the scope of the Military history WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. To use this banner, please see the full instructions.
Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality assessment scale.
WikiProject Physics / Acoustics  (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Physics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Physics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
This article is supported by Acoustics Taskforce.
 


(untitled)[edit]

Someone should delete that paragraph about 7 Hz causing building materials to vibrate and therefore provide no protection. That is the dumbest thing I ever read. Or maybe someone should add a citation, to a paper describing bullets traveling through shaking walls so I can better understand. So stupid.


I deleted this external link because it is 404.

Anthony Appleyard 12:42, 7 Nov 2004 (UTC)

As someone who hears low frequencies I can assure you they pass straight through windows, plaster, paneling, even stone walls. Water is the only material I've noticed that really stops them. Wnt (talk) 18:30, 17 January 2008 (UTC)

FORCE THREE[edit]

I refuse to believe that a Russian terrorist group has a working sonic cannon capable of knocking down a building but nobody has ever even heard of these guys. An outrageous claim with absolutely no cited sources, reliable or otherwise. Sounds like a conspiracy nut to me. Deleted. 130.215.228.96 04:52, 1 November 2006 (UTC)Taylor That's the logic flaw with conspiracy theories about secret weapons : if it's so good why haven't they used it? The weapon left in the armoury never won a battle.... 145.253.108.22 09:04, 23 February 2007 (UTC)

The axe[edit]

I removed the following section because one of its claims, that the website reporting this "fact" no longer exists, is quite true:

French scientists in 1960 developed an infra sound gun using a roots type supercharger driven by a Detroit 671 engine. This air supply was chopped by mechanical valves at 7 cps and ducted through pipes to an array of 9 horns. They were able to knock the bark off of trees nine miles away. Work on the weapon stopped after malfunctions of some kind and on more than one occasion killed the operating crew. In all the discussions on "non lethal" weapons where ultrasonics are mentioned, only "sound" is considered. The real ultrasonic weapons are not sound weapons as such, the fact is that shock waves are being generated at an ultrasonic rate. Shock waves travel faster than the speed of sound and must in order to remain a shock wave. They are a micro thin layer of compressed air traveling beyond mach and as such, can insinuate themselves into solid objects and come out the other side almost undeminished. They can be coherient and can be combined with other such beams in order to produce a number of effects against the target. Some PCTs are able to move their surface fast enough and with great enough force to produce a shock wave. Provided it's surface is flat, the wave will be coherient. Another method of producing such a train of shock waves would be to combine two or more ultrasonic fields in such a way that a soloton wave is produced. Keeping it coherient is another story.

—Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.237.115.113 (talkcontribs)

I'm not going to share all my knowledge on the topic and notably on French experiments, because even when having been performed in R&D centres dedicated to civil applications, they might be classified today. On the other hand, if you read French, there's a bunch of interesting footnotes with links to serious articles/sources in this article which itself comes from a questionable political source. --N00w (talk) 20:54, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

A reported real "sonic bullet"[edit]

There was a report of a real "sonic bullet" developed as a weapon against plane hijackers, but that web page has disappeared.

If anyone can find an alternate source (and preferably some more information) on this, please feel free to restore and correct it. siafu 22:41, 12 July 2005 (UTC)

Yes, here. Feel free to restore and correct it if you want. --N00w (talk) 20:26, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

Infrasound as irritant[edit]

This is still true and I have restored it. Anthony Appleyard 07:56, 6 November 2005 (UTC)

Japanese War Tuba#Sonic or acoustic weapon technology[edit]

The author of the section Japanese War Tuba#Sonic or acoustic weapon technology was probably unaware of this article; the material there belongs here. Most of it is already covered but there are some sources/references that might be of value. I have placed the appropriate merge tags. MCB 21:21, 13 March 2006 (UTC)

Sounds right. Melchoir 01:43, 14 March 2006 (UTC)

As the author of the war tuba article, it makes sense to provide a cross link (for more info, see the following, etc.) The references probably should be included/merged under sonic weaponry. The reference to sonic weaponry in the war tuba article should not be removed entirely, as this is a commentary on the comic idea of a war tuba itself, and acts as an intro to the idea of sonic weaponry. Maybe the entire war tuba article should be included as part of the urban legends or some such thing associated with Sonic weapons. The article is unique enough in name to remain as a stand alone snippett in the encyclopedia. Ema Zee

hmm??[edit]

"As used in air,"...shouldn`t that rather say as used in aeronautics, coz if used on land it is too sorta "in air" just to make it clear and less ambiguous. Due to doppler shifts, drag etc, using them on a plane etc, is fiction, choppers though would work.Slicky 08:25, 19 August 2006 (UTC)

report[edit]

Ultrasound as a weapon is being used against American citizens in Indiana. Any experts out there wish to make a study, look to Terre Haute, maybe its the communication towers, that is my guess. It is an open secret along with its corrupt mental health system. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.114.163.227 (talkcontribs) 17 October 2006

I suppose we should really be watching out for those chemtrails too, huh? siafu 19:09, 18 October 2006 (UTC)

External link request[edit]

I would like to suggest this essay on sonic weapons as an external link: http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/256/sonic_weapons.html

I am the editor of the site, so I'm requesting the link rather than adding it in myself

Sonic Weapons were at the ready in New york during the 2004 Republican National Convention.[edit]

There is incontrovertible proof that sonic weapons were at the ready, pointed at protesters and mounted on Police vehicles during the New York Republican National Convention in 2004. This proves beyond a doubt that these weapons have past their development stage and have become a legitimate form of crowd control by the American Police. There is film footage and photographic evidence to confirm these points. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Nmollo (talkcontribs) 14:35, 11 November 2007 (UTC)

Deletion of split Sonic weaponry in popular culture[edit]

The page of pop culture references that was split off has just been nominated for deletion by November 21, 2007, unless some notability is established. Interested parties might want to head over there and add their two cents. -- Binksternet (talk) 17:58, 16 November 2007 (UTC)

The split off material has been deleted. Binksternet (talk) 03:49, 15 June 2008 (UTC)

Merge from Infrasound gun[edit]

The Infrasound gun page is underdeveloped and doesn't stand well on its own. I propose it be trimmed and rewritten for clarity, then merged into an appropriate section on this page. Binksternet (talk) 23:22, 7 December 2007 (UTC)

  • Support. Definitely belongs here, as a subset of this more comprehensive article. --MCB (talk) 01:21, 8 December 2007 (UTC)

MKULTRA[edit]

Are there any references to the "Perfect Concussion" program? I heard it was a flop because it was nonselective (damaged entire brain instead of erasing memory) but I wondered if anyone has more information.

Without references, this should probably not be added as it's speculation without backing. JWhiteheadcc (talk) 00:18, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

[Wikipedia]: Another MKUltra effort, Subproject 54, was the Navy's top secret "Perfect Concussion" program, which was supposed to use sub-aural frequency blasts to erase memory. However, the program was never carried out.[21] --N00w (talk) 21:48, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

Vuvuzela[edit]

I know many people find these incredibly irritating but I don't really think they belong in an article about sonic weapons! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 217.43.135.68 (talk) 15:16, 24 November 2010 (UTC)

2013 and no new research/science discoveries/applications/weaponizing/miniaturizing?[edit]

68.188.203.251 (talk) 14:26, 6 January 2013 (UTC) Remember where J Foster as the astronomer poses this as the question she would ask when confronting an alien race: How did you do it? How did you get past? This is where our society comes acropper. Any personalized weapon that can kill without being seen to do so is where society ends. There could be no group trust due to this instantaneous lethality. Where are the progress updates for this page? If the answer is there aren't any then that is an answer in itself.

___ Speculation. This is serious matter. On the other hand, there's effective new research in 2013, easily found on the Web - so why bother with conspiracy theories?

Just visit some of the manufacturers' websites, certain specialized in acoustic/sonic weapons, others in the detection of sounds (could be used as countermeasures), search for their patents, etc.:

LRAD Corporation (including crowd control)

SARA, Inc.

BAE Systems

Raytheon Company

Finmeccanica through its subsidiary Selex ES

Thales Airborne Systems (direct link to detection equipment)

etc.

And another interesting article here.

--N00w (talk) 23:08, 13 May 2013 (UTC)