Talk:Space Race

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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Space Race:
  1. Remove inappropriate Infobox Military Conflict JustinTime55 (talk) 22:13, 23 February 2011 (UTC)
  2. Remove OR "US-Soviet Joint Victory"
  3. Unsourced/uncited OR (e.g. "Had von Braun's team been allowed to orbit a satellite in 1956, the Space Race might have been over before it gained sufficient momentum to yield real benefits.")
  • Repair all mis-spellings of William E. Burrows's name as "Burroughs" in the citation Notes.
  • Action recommendations outlined in Peer review 2 The older peer review suggestions were taken care of JustinTime55 (talk) 21:10, 18 February 2011 (UTC)
  • Remove speculative section I think this has been done JustinTime55 (talk) 16:22, 20 May 2010 (UTC)
  • Add reliable sources as references and cite them--Abebenjoe (talk) 02:18, 15 August 2010 (UTC)
  • Move irrelevant content not related to space race between USSR-USA 1950's-1970's -- out to History of spaceflight JustinTime55 (talk) 20:03, 14 May 2010 (UTC)
  • Revise Unmanned planetary probes section (Venus) JustinTime55 (talk) 15:57, 3 June 2010 (UTC)
  • Expand Unmanned planetary probes section (Mars) JustinTime55 (talk) 21:01, 4 June 2010 (UTC)
  • Expand on economic impact on the Russian Space agency--Abebenjoe (talk) 02:18, 15 August 2010 (UTC)
  • Correct spelling errors which occur midway through the article--Abebenjoe (talk) 02:18, 15 August 2010 (UTC)
  • Cleanup and shorten End of the space race new article really doesn't reflect this so it is stricken from the list.--Abebenjoe (talk) 02:18, 15 August 2010 (UTC)
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Start of the Space Race[edit]

The United States didn't spontaneously decide to launch a satellite when the Sputnik was announced (and neither did the Soviets). This took two years of preparation. The US made the first decision to launch at the International Geophysical Year in 1955, and the Soviets reacted with their decision to launch four days later; this effectively started the race. Sputnik is the first recognizable milestone, but that doesn't mean that started the race. Do not edit war; don't change the introduction without discussion. JustinTime55 (talk) 14:40, 10 February 2014 (UTC)

Category: Astronomical controversies?[edit]

User:Solomonfromfinland apparently created Category:Astronomical controversies, and recently added it to this article. Why do you think the Space Race was an "astronomical controversy"?

I think in including "Controversies in astronomy and spaceflight" when creating the category, you are conflating two things that aren't in fact related. Astronomy is a scientific discipline, and scientists can disagree about theories of astronomy. Spaceflight, by contrast, isn't just the science of astronomy; it is an engineering discipline (and could be categorized specifically with transportation) based on creating vehicles to fly in space. And any "controversies" that arise in spaceflight are basically political in nature. (I also don't think it's appropriate to categorize spaceflight accidents and failures as "controversies"; controversy means people disagree, and no one disagrees that failures and accidents are bad things which shouldn't happen.) The category should be broken out into a separate one for spaceflight, if you feel it's necessary to categorize these as such. JustinTime55 (talk) 15:52, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

Perhaps I can break up the category I created, splitting off part into "Category:Controversies in spaceflight" or something like that, which could be a subcategory of Category:Astronomical controversies. (I have long regarded spaceflight as a part of astronomy.)--Solomonfromfinland (talk) 16:00, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

Ongoing space race[edit]

Several Asian countries are currently engaged in a space race. India's propaganda has been enhanced with its Mars Orbiter Mission reaching Mars orbit. I think that this article should not limit itself to the USA-Russia race, as it is still happening elsewhere. I propose to expand this article with the Asian space race. Cheers, BatteryIncluded (talk) 19:19, 28 September 2014 (UTC)

Oppose This article covers the historical, cold war race between the US and the USSR. As such, the "new race" is entirely out of scope. Expanding it has been tried before, and rejected. (Check the archives of this page.) Which is not to say that a new Asian space race article isn't warranted. Oops; I just typed that, expecting it to be a redlink, and look -- surprise, surprise. JustinTime55 (talk) 16:35, 17 October 2014 (UTC)

Variables for American success[edit]

I have moved the following recent addition here for discussion:

Although it seemed evident that the Soviet Union would win the race, the United States reached ultimate success in the space competition in 1969. [1] The US did not orbit a satellite until January 31, 1958, four months after Sputnik 1. [2] Overall, the United States possessed far more sophisticated applications satellites and landed men on the moon numerous times compared to the Soviet Union. (Brown, 2011, p.177) NASA was created nine months after Sputnik, and made a prestige-based manned lunar program its majority in late 1959.[3] The U.S. Congress created NASA and approved the funds requested by President Kennedy for a manned mission to the moon. Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin went to the moon in 1961. The success of this mission is often used to commemorate America’s triumph in the space race. [4] The United State's success can be explained by success, which is the dependent variable, and three independent variables: the focuses of the space programs, the economic philosophies of the two states, and secrecy among the respective scientific communities. [5]

− Success is the dependent variable of the Space Race. Both programs were very successful compared to nations, who were lacking in space efforts. The United States and the Soviet Union were virtually the only two superpowers in the Space Race. The United States were considered more successful, because they developed the Saturn V, which was a super-booster that took the Apollo astronauts to the moon, and whose power the Russians were never able to match. [6] The Apollo-Saturn system was far more sophisticated than the Russian's systems. in the 1970s, the space race shifted from the moon to low Earth orbit (LEO). The United States produced Skylab, which was a larger and far more complex space system then its Russian counterpart's module, Salyut. [7] − Focus, is one of the independent variables supporting the United State's success. The Soviet Union focuses its costs into the exploration of the planets, while the United States focused space research on earthbound needs. [8] The United states eventually turned its focuses on grand actions in space after these actions would immediately translate into increased geostrategic influence. Following the launch of Sputnik, the Soviets concentrated on bio-astronautic flights, while the United States focused on communications satellites. The USSR focused on space activity that would return profits to their economy, failing to realize the value of applications satellites for many years. The United States saved $38 billion for its economy through the achievements of applications satellites by the end of the 1970s. [9] The Soviets focused on opportunities to promote space propaganda. They made three attempts to hit the moon in 1959; Luna 2 succeeded, carrying more than 150 hammer-and-sickle emblems of the USSR to scatter over the moon's surface for propaganda purposes. (Brown, 2011, p.179) These emblems took up space and weight in Luna 2 that could have been reserved for scientific instruments. − The second independent variable explaining the success of the U.S is their economic philosophy. The Soviet space program had a greater relative cost than the American because they were half as productive as the U.S, and their technological base was inferior. [10] The Soviet satellite design philosophy was an extreme economic force that was heavily influenced by communism and run by a highly centralized organization. On the other hand, the American economic approach was founded on market mechanisms that could equilibrate the management of resources. [11] − The third independent variable is secrecy, or lack of it. The Soviet scientific establishment suffered from excessive secrecy. For example, the scientists that worked in the Soviet space program were not permitted to participate in the launching of space vehicles. They were also kept in the dark about the hardware and operational characteristics of the spacecrafts. The openness of the American space program led to the success of the U.S. The lack of secrecy in the U.S allowed the American establishment to thrive and flourish, while the Soviet Union was inhibited by excessive secrecy. [12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shaw, J. (2007). The Sputnik Legacy: 50 Years in Retrospect. Air & Space Power Journal, 21(3), 26.
  2. ^ McQuaid, K. (2007). Sputnik Reconsidered: Image and Reality in the Early Space Age. Canadian Review of American Studies, 37(3), 371-401.
  3. ^ McQuaid, K. (2007). Sputnik Reconsidered: Image and Reality in the Early Space Age. Canadian Review of American Studies, 37(3), 371-401.
  4. ^ Dickens, P., & Ormrod, J. (2008, February). Who Really Won the Space Race?. Monthly Review: An Independent Socialist Magazine. 30-37.
  5. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  6. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  7. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  8. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  9. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  10. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  11. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.
  12. ^ Brown, T. (2011). The American and Soviet Cold War Space Programs. Comparative Strategy, 30(2), 177-185.

If this is going to stay, it needs a lot of cleanup work, for style and structuring for readability (notice it is onetwo large, unreadable paragraphs.) But, should it in fact stay? If so, should it stay in this form (i.e., does it give WP:Undue weight to a particular, idiosyncratic analysis of the history, or does it supposedly represent historical consensus? Or should we just mention that some authors (who seem to be Canadian socialists) analyze it in this way?

Can we get a discussion going? Thanks. JustinTime55 (talk) 15:15, 6 November 2014 (UTC)

The proposed text is clearly pro-American. I'm not anti-American by any means. It just reads like user:Mayamcgee is emphasizing NASA as glorious and infallible, while dismissing the Soviet space program as a paranoid propaganda machine. Indeed, it is redundant to what is already in the article.
Some typos as well e.g. "Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin went to the moon in 1961".
By the way user:JustinTime55 nice work in recent edits, much more neutral. M∧Ŝc2ħεИτlk 08:40, 7 November 2014 (UTC)