Talk:Specific energy

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energy density vs. specific energy : any physical difference?[edit]

Both are measured in the same units. The same confusion seems to reign for specific power and power density. IMHO e.d. and s.e. are both being used interchangeably and should thus be merged (as in the power case). -- Kku (talk) 08:34, 6 July 2010 (UTC)

Depending on the words used, specific power is power per unit *mass*. Power density is power per unit *volume*. The thing is that the Wikipedia isn't a dictionary, articles are on the topic, not the words for the topic.
So the fact that the term 'specific power' might be used sometimes to talk about power per unit volume; that doesn't matter, power per unit volume goes in one article, and power per unit mass goes in another.- Wolfkeeper 12:53, 6 July 2010 (UTC)

Notational convention[edit]

The following statement was removed because it does not seem to be universal. At best it may be a convention adopted by some authors in some fields.

These intensive properties are each symbolized by using the lower case letter of the symbol for the corresponding extensive property, which is symbolized by a capital letter. For example, the extensive thermodynamic property enthalpy is symbolized by H; specific enthalpy is symbolized by h.

If this is an official guideline of some institution, it should be presented as such. Note that such technical writing guidelines are never legally binding (nor even within the country where they may be issued) and authors are always free to follow or disregard them. --Jorge Stolfi (talk) 13:23, 24 February 2013 (UTC)

Reference list[edit]

A reference list showing a range of values for typical systems/substances would be useful here. For instance, the vanadium redox battery links here in an jnfobox, which implies that one could gain some sense of what the 10–20 Wh/kg means on this page (beyomd the obvious dimensional analysis. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.26.48.213 (talk) 13:33, 10 May 2014 (UTC)