Talk:Spotted Elk

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Photographs[edit]

The portrait shows a man with a crippled left hand, the picture taken at Wounded Knee obviously not. So it seems that this cannot be the same person. Does anyone know more about this? --Meile 17:07, 31 December 2006 (UTC)

Hi Meile, I thought that at first too, but if you look more closely at the portrait you can see that it is just white cloth covering part of his left hand and wrist.

Number of casualties[edit]

This article claims that 290 Lakota tribal members died during the Wounded Knee Massacre, however the wiki page of that event says about 150 Lakota Sioux died: In all, 84 men, 44 women, and 18 children reportedly died on the field, while at least seven of Lakota were mortally wounded. There are unsubstantiated claims that these numbers are under reported by almost half. If that is true, then the number on this page is rather hypothetical. Zonder 13:35, 20 September 2007 (UTC)

Sasquatch?[edit]

The article starts with "Big Foot (aka Sasquatch) (Si Tȟaŋka ) (1824? - December 29, 1890), also known as Spotted foot Elk, was the name of a chief of a sub-group of the Lakota Sioux." Sasquatch is the Halkomelem-inspired name for the mythical "bigfoot", I find it unlikely that the Lakota chief was known under that name. Are there any sources for that? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.250.96.14 (talk) 23:31, 29 August 2008 (UTC)

Never mind, it was obviously added by one of the vandalising morons. Removed it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.250.96.14 (talk) 23:38, 29 August 2008 (UTC)

Touch the Clouds[edit]

Lone Horn had at least two notable sons: Big Foot and Touch the Clouds. Both where his sons, so that makes them brothers. I included Touch the Clouds in the article therefore. Jouke Bersma Contributions 08:14, 27 November 2008 (UTC) Reason he was named BigFoot was he often be known to put his FOOT down in order offer peace, —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.174.76.65 (talk) 22:19, 19 February 2011 (UTC)

Proposing a move[edit]

If people from his tribe prefer the name "Chief Spotted Elk" would anyone mind if I moved the article to that name? -Uyvsdi (talk) 16:58, 21 September 2009 (UTC)Uyvsdi

I went ahead and moved this article; however, couldn't bring the history along due to the fact that Spotted Elk was a pre-existing redirect. For the history of this article, please check out Big Foot and Talk:Big Foot. Apologies for the inconvenience. -Uyvsdi (talk) 23:40, 24 September 2009 (UTC)Uyvsdi

Para removal for lack of sourcing[edit]

I've removed the following paragraph/section because it was added all in one go with absolutely no sourcing. Perhaps I should have just marked it "citation needed" but there are just too many details for me to just leave it without sources. I also removed a "reference" to a single person, definitely not a WP:RS by Wikipedia standards.

===Controversial photograph===

The photograph attached to this page is a mis-identification of the Miniconjou Chief Spotted Elk. This is actually a photograph of an Oglala Bigfoot who was born in 1832 and who died after Wounded Knee sometime in 1899. There has been a lot of confusion surrounding this photograph but there is scattered documentation concerning this. Recently the Beinecke Library at Yale University released a copy of the original portfolio which includes the above photograph, another profile photo, and two photographs of this man's wife. They are labeled Bigfoot and White Hawk, and this is a portfolio of Oglalas and not Miniconjou. This Bigfoot's name was Ste Si tanka, which translates to lame Si Tanka, indicating there was something wrong with his foot or leg. He might have had a limp. The name that was given to Chief Spotted Elk at Ft. Bennett by the wasicu, was simply Si Tanka (or Bigfoot). The Oglala Bigfoot was married to a woman named White Horse Owner. It isn't clear if White Hawk was another translation error or if she was an earlier wife but He Dog states in an interview that This Ste Si Tanka was the father of Plenty Bear and Six Feathers. Census Documents from 1893-1899 confirm this. Also elsewhere, John Colhoff, interpreter, states that this was the Oglala Bigfoot. For further information contact Calvin Spotted Elk, the great great grandson of Chief Spotted Elk. He has photographs of his grandfather that should replace the one linked here.

Cheers, Pigman☿/talk 23:41, 4 December 2011 (UTC)