Talk:Sputnik 1

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Decay Date[edit]

I see a conflict on this... The currently official information, albeit historical, states:

1957-001B           2   CIS        96.1    65.0      945        227         N/A
SPUTNIK 1                              Launched (10/04/1957)  Decayed [01/03/1958]
1957-001A           1   CIS        96.2    65.1      938        214     20.4200
SL-1 R/B                               Launched (10/04/1957)  Decayed [12/01/1957]

Source:
                          SATELLITE SITUATION REPORT

                          October 24, 2011

                     THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF DATA COMPUTED AT
                   UNITED STATES STRATEGIC COMMAND (USSTRATCOM),
             AIR FORCE SPACE COMMAND (AFSPC) OR PROVIDED BY SATELLITE
                  OWNERS.  THE REPORT IS COMPILED AND PROVIDED BY:

                                 HQ AFSPC/XOCS
                          150 VANDENBERG ST. STE 1105
                          PETERSON AFB, CO 80914-4220

75.175.205.81 (talk) 15:14, 28 October 2011 (UTC)


Perhaps related to this, I'm wondering how Sputnik achieved 1440 orbits (as currently stated in the infobox). The NASA NSSDC site says "around 1400 orbits". At 96.2 minutes per orbit, and 92 days in orbit (Oct 4-Jan 4), there should be around 1377 orbits. Does orbital period decrease significantly as orbit starts to decay? I'm changing the infobox figure to 1400 (close enough to 1377, and sourced by NSSDC).Plantdrew (talk) 21:20, 30 January 2013 (UTC)
Kepler's third law: the square of the orbital period of a planet is proportional to the cube of the semi-major axis of its orbit. Or in other words: yes, the orbital period decreases as the orbit decays. 86.153.28.37 (talk) 17:19, 20 October 2014 (UTC)

Sputnik translated meaning[edit]

Maybe someone should add that "sputnik' translated from Russian means literally "fellow traveler". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.20.242.81 (talk) 17:14, 23 August 2012 (UTC)

"Impact" section[edit]

Removed the inverted commas around the words "great accomplishment" in "Impact" section. No, really, does anyone here honestly think that launching the world's first artificial satellite and starting the Space Age isn't a great achievement? Absolutely no matter what launching such a satellite means now. Speaking about the facts described in the section, the fact that the world's reaction greatly surpassed the expectations of both US and USSR governments only serves to prove the importance of this event. It's value will transcend currently existing nations as it had transcended the existence of USSR. 37.144.167.137 (talk) 14:36, 8 August 2013 (UTC)

Media file[edit]

Why does this article link to commons:File:Possible PDM signal labeled as Sputnik by NASA.ogg? The description there specifically states, "This is not the Sputnik-1 signal. [...] Please don't link this into the article on Sputnik-1. It is not Sputnik-2 or 3 either, so nobody really knows what it is. It does appear to be some kind of PDM signal, maybe from a Soviet spacecraft." Shouldn't this link (and many others listed on the File: page at Commons) be removed? - dcljr (talk) 00:21, 3 February 2014 (UTC)

Conflicting Data (Completed Orbits)[edit]

Up on the top of the page it says that Sputnik completed 1350 orbits before decaying. Lower down in the page in the Launch and Mission Section it's written that there were 1440 completed orbits.

Visibility of Sputnik I[edit]

The article currently states "It was visible all around the Earth and its radio pulses were detectable." However, Sputnik I itself was quite dim around magnitude 5 and could not be seen from most areas of Earth especially in cities. The top stage of the R7 rocket did get carried into orbit with Sputnik though, and it traveled behind the satellite in the sky. Anecdotal evidence proves this booster stage was visible, and predictions were printed in newspapers about when to see this object. I think this factoid should be added to reflect the fact Sputnik itself was not visible. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.166.77.226 (talk) 17:55, 25 September 2014 (UTC)