Talk:Standard enthalpy of formation

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equation incorrect[edit]

equation for standard enthalpy change of reaction should be changed to reflect that fact that the stoichiometric numbers of reactants are already negative, thus there is no need for to have separate reactant and product terms in the equation. It also needs general cleanup; words like "products" do not belong in equations, and "reaction" should be simply "r" according to convention. Use the equation on the standard enthalpy change of reaction as a model. 71.121.232.215 (talk) 05:13, 7 April 2009 (UTC)

Also, aren't the stoichiometric values wrong?

CH4 + 3 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O

On left: 1C, 4H, 6O On Right 1C, 4H, 4O

I'm assuming the eqn should be: CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O but I'm still a little new to enthalpy so will leave it to somebody else! :-) (Chris Fletcher) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Chris Fletcher (talkcontribs) 13:14, 2 June 2010 (UTC)


This article states what it is and how to use it. But fails to define the origin of the tables or how the individual molecules enthalpy change of formation are derived. Does there exist a known mathematical way in which to come up with these numbers? 96.2.120.230 (talk) 18:32, 6 August 2010 (UTC)

NaOH data wrong[edit]

Standard heat of formation is listed in table here as 426 kJ/mol while wikipedia article on Sodium Hydroxide claims it is 735 kJ/mol. Both can not be right.71.31.146.16 (talk) 07:00, 20 June 2012 (UTC)

Atkins and de Paula list -425.61 for NaOH(s) and the NIST webbook gives -425.93, so I have corrected the NaOH article. The value in this article is close. However the table does need reformatting - the minus sign for this value (and a few others) is hidden on the preceding line because the columns are too narrow. Dirac66 (talk) 14:37, 20 June 2012 (UTC)
OK, formatting fixed. Dirac66 (talk) 19:21, 20 June 2012 (UTC)