Talk:Steel guitar

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This entire page looks like a potential copyright violation, taken verbatim from this site:

http://www.well.com/user/wellvis/steel.html

I'm working on rewriting it, and I'm also making separate pages for "lap steel guitar" and "pedal steel guitar." they're related, but different from one another, enough, i think, to justify separate pages.


Request for History section[edit]

It would be nice to see a subsection of this article document the invention of the steel guitar method, as other articles pertaining to musical technique tend to have. 72.95.184.97 22:50, 21 July 2007 (UTC)


There's a request for a picture of one of these types of guitar. I am in the process of taking other pictures for Wikipedia and could take a picture of my dobro like guitar (wooden body with large metal cone in the middle and two smaller ones at the top). It isn't a lap or pedal steel though. --KayEss 12:31, 26 Nov 2004 (UTC)

I've completely re-written the page (hopefully no copyright problems now) and added a picture to it too --KayEss 07:06, 27 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Rem text[edit]

Metal-bodied guitars (commonly nickel-plated brass), although frequently played using a metal (or glass) slide, are not properly called steel guitars - they are 'resonator' guitars, which, instead of the more common soundhole, utilize a kind of internal metal (usually spun aluminium) passive loudspeaker, to amplify the sound.

The Dobro guitar which features a metal cone where the sound hole would normally be. The term 'Dobro guitar' is sometimes used to describe any resonator guitar, of any brand or style. Versions of this type of guitar, by Dobro and other manufacturers such as National, may feature the entire body made out of wood, painted steel, plated steel or plated brass (a 1937 Style 'O' National resonator is shown on the cover of the Dire Straits album Brothers in Arms).

Basically, the resonator guitars fall into one of two camps either Dobro or National - the difference is how the cone is activated. In the case of the Dobro by means of an aluminium 'spider' which transfers the vibrations from the saddle to the cone and in the case of National single cone models, by the saddle acting directly on the cone. Just to confuse matters National also produced a Tri-Cone guitar, which as the name suggests has three small cones connected by an aluminium 'T' piece.

I think that's already covered in resonator guitar, and/or belongs there.

There seems some variation in terminology. I'm assuming that steel guitar includes Dobro played steel fashion, but others may disagree. Andrewa 20:46, 18 April 2006 (UTC)

From pedal steel guitar[edit]

The lap steel, dobro (often played with a steel or slide) and pedal steel guitars are most closely associated with country music, western swing and bluegrass, although some players have used them in jazz, blues, jùjú, (a form from Nigeria that uses pedal steel extensively) and other musical genres.

This seems more relevant to the this article. Parts have been removed from pedal steel guitar. Andrewa 21:53, 20 April 2006 (UTC)

Doug Jernigan School Link[edit]

I removed this link because it is purely commercial with no additional information about steel guitar playing..... Jim, K7JEB

Steel Guitar VS. Bottleneck guitar.[edit]

I changed the wording in the section regarding the relationship between Steel Guitar & Bottleneck (or "slide") guitar. Steel guitar does not descend from bottleneck guitar. If anything, it is the opposite. Bottleneck guitar appears in Blues music AFTER the explosion of Hawaiian music (in the mainland U.S.)in the late 1800's. Some have claimed that bottleneck guitar descended from the Southern Black "Diddy Bow" (or a one-string instrument, consisting of a wire strung between two objects & played with an object slid over it), but there's no evidence pointing that way (and, if so, then why doesn't bottleneck style appear earlier in writings & recordings than it does?). There were many blues artists who also played both Bottleneck & Steel Guitar in hawaiian tunings. Either way, They are separate the Hawaiian guitar style did not originate in the blues bottleneck style. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.172.73.213 (talk) 18:02, 27 October 2009 (UTC)

best one[edit]

this explains the subject. the related articles are unclear re: style, instrument, application,...thx to the writers. Romanfall (talk) 07:47, 17 June 2010 (UTC)