Talk:Stephen B. Oates

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Plagiarism Scandal[edit]

This article needs to treat the accusation of plagiarism against Oates in a more even handed way. It seems way to much to say that he was "falsely" accused. NPOV? It really depends on what you think "plagiarism" is. The evidence is clear that he lifted passages from other's books. See http://historynewsnetwork.org/articles/article.html?id=648. Some think he is "guilty" and others don't. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.255.240.202 (talk) 20:20, 19 November 2007 (UTC)

Stephen B. Oates IS a plagiarist. Read the articles by Robert Bray (Journal of Information Ethics, 1994) and Michael Burlingame. There is no doubt about this. What he did was way too blatant. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Renchao89526 (talkcontribs) 06:25, 25 February 2009 (UTC)

sources[edit]

The link above is not working anymore. Personally after skimming some of the material, I'm not sure whether he committed "real" plagiarism or not. In any case the controversy was imho big enough to justify a few words in the article. I collected some of the sources on the issue, which are currently available online, in case somebody is interested to work them into the article:


Oates[edit]

What does "Stephen B Oats is a beast!!!!" mean?

The correct spelling of his last name is Oates.


We all have had the wonderful experience of enthralling lecturers in college. I had the pleasure of taking Stephen B. Oates' undergraduate American History course at UT Arlington while he was finishing his Ph.D. at UT Austin. His lectures were so engrossing that I remember actually hearing a groan of disappointment from the class when we were interrupted by the bell.

Professor Oates had the most profound affect upon me of all the teachers I had while attending UMass Amherst. I was lucky enough to participate in his senior seminar and to this day it stands as the most intellectually stimulating event in my life. I hope Dr. Oates is doing well in his retirement, I think of him often and reread his books from time to time.

As an undergraduate at UMass Amherst I had Professor Oates for two classes: History of the American Western Experience and History of the Civil War. After UMass I attended three years of law school at SUNY Buffalo. Hands down, in seven years of higher education, these were the two best classes I ever had and Professor Oates was the best instructor and lecturer. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 01:46, 14 October 2014 (UTC)