Talk:Stomp progression

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Chords[edit]

But what IS it? The "50s progresson" is defined as I-vi-IV-V. How is this "stomp progression" defined? --63.25.230.125 (talk) 11:57, 14 July 2008 (UTC)

Jackson 5 "I Want You Back"[edit]

The main chord motif in Jackson 5's "I Want You Back" sounds a lot like this progression. But of course I can't find a source that says so PenguiN42 (talk) 00:30, 11 September 2009 (UTC)

What is the Stomp progression?[edit]

Stomp progression in C with staggered thirds, chord roots in red About this sound Play .

The chords given in this article, obviously done in good faith, correspond to the A section of "King Porter Stomp." However, upon reading the article given as a reference, it appears that what musicologists refer to as the "stomp progression" is the progression of the "stomp" section, the riff section at the end of the song. This is the progression that appears in "Slipped Disc," "Jump Town," "At the Clambake Carnival" and "Bojangles," while similar progressions appear in "Study in Brown" and "Well, git it!" There is definitely no appearance of the A section progression from "King Porter Stomp" in those songs.

Here is the "Stomp progression":

ǁ: IV7 #ivo7 | I7/5 V7/IV | IV7 #iv°7 | I7/5 V7/IV | IV7 #iv°7 | I7/5 V7/II | V7/V | V7 V7/IV  :ǁ

In the original key of A:

ǁ: G77 | D7/A D7 | G77 | D7/A D7 | G77 | D7/A B7 | E7 | A7 D7  :ǁ

Could someone else please clarify that this is what is meant by "stomp progression" in the article? If nobody cares then I will just change it. BassHistory (talk) 09:31, 19 December 2010 (UTC)

Add "Hyena Stomp" to the list, probably the most clear example. "The Golden Striker" has the same progression as well.BassHistory (talk) 09:58, 19 December 2010 (UTC)

(Sorry, I couldn't resist: since you put a B7 in the example I assume you meant V7/II (or something of the sort) above, so I edited it in the article. I don't know which is right so I went with my instinct... Please invert the correction if that's not what you meant. As for the original question, I have no clue whatsoever, so I'll respectfully bow out. 151.66.225.186 (talk) 16:43, 23 December 2010 (UTC) )
No need to apologize. Thanks for correcting the typo.BassHistory (talk) 17:15, 23 December 2010 (UTC)


Also, although "King Porter Stomp" starts in A, the "stomp" part is in D, so shouldn't there be a change here? The chord progression as written is "numbered" as if the key was D, not A. Banjochris (talk) 00:10, 6 July 2011 (UTC)

Yes please fix this - the chord progression given makes no sense in A (for early jazz!) Drabauer (talk) 04:09, 24 August 2011 (UTC)drabauer

OK, I think I have fixed it, but please let me know if there still seem to be problems. The piece is in Db. The stomp section is really in Gb, a sort of trio, but I've altered the scale-degree chords so that they all relate to Db (some were in Db, some in Ab). Enjoy the bass line at the end of the original version! Justlettersandnumbers (talk) 20:51, 24 August 2011 (UTC)
Well you guys I liked it better when the Roman numerals showed the secondary dominants a la harmonic analysis, for instance I7 in "classical speak" really means a major 7th chord. It should really be notated like V7/IV, meaning it is the dominant of the subdominant.BassHistory (talk) 04:34, 28 December 2013 (UTC)