Talk:Stowaway

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Unclear sentence[edit]

Usually, a stowaway tries to jump into an airplane by hanging on to the airliner's landing gear as the plane takes off, and the impact that the velocity of the airplane added to the power of the wind cause could easily make a stowaway fall to his death. What? does this really happen? How often do they do it? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.199.55.231 (talk) 07:11, 17 February 2006

I'm entirely unable to figure out what "the velocity of the airplane added to the power of the wind cause" is supposed to mean. There's seldom room in the wheel well of an airplane for a human being to fit undamaged. Its unlikely that someone with no knowledge of the mechanics would be able to happen into a livable position during the short time it takes the gear to retract. There's probably little strong wind inside the wheel well, but I there is air movement, even a little heat from the pressurization outflow valves. Not enough to make a difference.
There's no heat in the wheel well, so that reference in the article is misinformed. There is cold (-35F) and there is little oxygen, either of which would kill someone who survived gear retraction.
Then someone would have to be awake, alert, and physically able to hang on somehow inside the wheel well during gear extension and the shock of touchdown. The chances are not good.76.21.139.195 02:49, 15 January 2007 (UTC)

More details[edit]

Recommend more details about the cases where the stowaway about an airplane did not die. I once was an unwitting stowaway. I boarded the wrong plane. I got on in time when I heard the announcement and did not want to go to the wrong city. Suomi Finland 2009 (talk) 21:23, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

The most famous case, Armando Socarras, happened in 1969. Just that time span means that there isn't very much online unless you pay for the New York Times archive. Also, he landed in Franco Spain and was kept secluded so even the NYT articles may contain information from governments (US and Spain) which were both pretty happy to have a touching propaganda coup against Castro. Lastly, while there is no dispute he survived the trip by some miracle (and probably inspired plenty of Cubans to die trying to emulate him) he himself has changed the details of the story several times, especially regarding his companion and even his age at the time of the incident is in dispute...reported as 17 or 18 in the beginning, then 22, then 18 and he's only added to the confusion. I'm more worried about the ones where they discover the bodies days later. Don't they at least shine a flashlight up there during aircraft turnaround to check for leaks or something? My other stupid question is all the Havana stowaways hide in the 1-2 meter grass at the end of the runway. Maybe they need a lawnmower? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.85.183.219 (talk) 06:54, 9 February 2010 (UTC)

Too many examples[edit]

I think the list of examples is missing the point somewhat. There must have been many thousands if not millions of examples in history, so we can not list them all. What then is the intention of this section? --John (talk) 16:32, 10 September 2012 (UTC)

I agree that this list should be restricted to the most notable cases only. --Daniel (talk) 05:12, 14 September 2012 (UTC)
Thank you very much John, for your very swift response to my suggestion to clean-up this list. Truly speaking, I didn't expect that you would go as far as removing the whole list. What do you think if we restore this list, but would mention only the most notable cases, such as of Kingsley Ofosu, whose ordeal was dramatized even as a movie, and alike? --Daniel (talk) 05:49, 14 September 2012 (UTC)
Let's agree here which cases are most notable first. --John (talk) 05:52, 14 September 2012 (UTC)
That's a good idea, I'll go through the list and will provide my suggestion here. --Daniel (talk) 05:55, 14 September 2012 (UTC)

──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── At sea

  • Perce Blackborow (1896 – 1949), an 18-year-old Welsh sailor, became a stowaway on Ernest Shackleton's ship Endurance during the ill fated 1914 Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. He was found three days after the ship set sail from Buenos-Aires, but proved himself as a good steward and was eventually signed onto the crew. His story was fictionalised in Shackleton's Stowaway novel by Victoria McKernan.
  • In 1992, crew members of the Bahamian-flagged cargo ship McRuby discovered a group of nine African stowaways aboard and murdered eight of them, not willing to pay fines for bringing illegal immigrants to France. Ghanaian Kingsley Ofosu was the only one who managed to escape the massacre and was hiding aboard till the ship reached Le Havre. His story was dramatized in the 1996 television movie Deadly Voyage.

By air

  • In 1999, two Guinean teenagers, Yaguine Koita and Fodé Tounkara, were stowaways who froze to death flying from Conakry, to Brussels, Belgium. Their bodies were later discovered in the aircraft's wheel bay. The moving letter about the hardships of their life in Guinea, which was found on their bodies, was published by the world media.
  • In 2000, an unidentified Tahitian man was discovered in the wheel well of Air France Boeing-474 in Los Angeles that originated in French Polynesia. Authorities described it is as a "miracle" that the man survived 7 1/2-hour flight inside the unheated and unpressurized landing gear at 38,000 feet (12,000 m) and temperatures of −50 °F (−46 °C). He was rushed to UCLA medical center with body temperature of only 79 °F (26 °C), while temperature below 85 °F (29 °C) is considered to be fatal, according to experts. He recovered fully but was flown back to Tahiti under orders from the Immigration and Naturalization Service.[1]--Daniel (talk) 07:29, 14 September 2012 (UTC)
    • They will all need to be properly sourced. Can they be? --John (talk) 10:34, 15 September 2012 (UTC)
      • Well, the last one is already sourced. And the rest have Wikipedia articles devoted to them. I'm sure it wouldn't be a problem to find RS references to their stories.--Daniel (talk) 11:00, 15 September 2012 (UTC)
I would prefer to have the full list, but in a separate article. Or move it to wikidata --helohe (talk) 18:25, 25 January 2013 (UTC)
For those interested in perusing the full list, as it existed before being removed from the article, here's the last version of the article that still contained it. -- Vmenkov (talk) 00:40, 16 November 2013 (UTC)

Source number 2[edit]

I don't think source number 2 (http://american-rattlesnake.org/2010/08/stowaways-to-america-a-true-story/) is relevant. It's not quite an article (it reads more like a novel), and its truthfulness can be debated. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.5.216.100 (talk) 13:24, 8 November 2012 (UTC)

  1. ^ Stowaway recovering from ordeal at 38,000 feet. Los Angeles Times, August 05, 2000.