Talk:Strong pseudoprime

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Redundant?[edit]

"A strong pseudoprime to base a is always an Euler pseudoprime to base a (Pomerance, Selfridge, Wagstaff 1980), but not all Euler pseudoprimes are strong pseudoprimes. Some Fermat pseudoprimes and Carmichael numbers are also strong pseudoprimes."

"A strong pseudoprime to base a is always an Euler pseudoprime to base a" includes that every strong pseudoprime is a fermat pseudoprime. So "Some Fermat pseudoprimes and Carmichael numbers are also strong pseudoprimes" is redundant and should be: "Some Carmichael numbers are also strong pseudoprimes". --Arbol01 23:40, 9 January 2007 (UTC)

Clarify relation to Miller-Rabin Test[edit]

My understanding is that the Strong Pseudo Prime Test is the same as the Miller-Rabin test, and that Strong Pseudo Prime Test was invented by Selfridge. I also understand that Miller-Rabin invented their test independently but later than Selfridge. The Miller-Rabin test got more publicity because they proved that it errs with probability at most 1/4th per iteration. Scott contini (talk) 02:08, 19 August 2010 (UTC)