Talk:Sukkah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Judaism (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Judaism, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Judaism-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Israel (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Israel, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Israel on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

2-1/2, 3, 4 walls[edit]

I undid the change that had removed the "2-1/2, 3 or 4 walls" reference and had added "supported by". The schach does NOT need to be supported by the walls per so. I believe a "Chazon Ish succah" is constructed with the schach supported only by "not mekabel tumah" items and that is typically accomplished with a wooden (perhaps plastic?) frame supporting the schach but with other material (not supporting the schach) for the actual walls. The "2-12, 3 or 4" reference is quite famous (from the Gemara) and is alluded to by the word sukkah - samech (4 walls), chaf (3 walls), hey (2-1/2 walls). Manassehkatz 14:56, 24 September 2007 (UTC)

No! 2 1/2 = 3, and besides the frame+filler=wall in halacha. Reverted. -- Y not? 04:08, 25 September 2007 (UTC)
I changed it to just "2-1/2" (since 4 > 3 > 2-1/2) as that is the halachic minimum. Yes, 2-1/2 is OK because it ends up equivalent to 3, but from a practical/visual standpoint it is still 2-1/2. Similarly, I also rephrased to not require the walls to support the schach since that is also not a physical requirement. Manassehkatz 04:19, 25 September 2007 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Manassehkatz (talkcontribs)
It's not even nearly 2.5 -- the third wall is kosher if it is a tefach (handbredth) wide, and is listed in Tractate Niddah as one of five things that requires a tefach in width. DRosenbach (Talk | Contribs) 03:10, 11 November 2008 (UTC)

Sukkah and Sukkah hopping[edit]

There have been discussions about the redundancy or need for a separate article on Sukkah hopping. There was a good discussion at Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Sukkah hopping, but no consensus emerged. It really makes no sense that a subject like "Sukkah hopping" which is not even part of the Halachot of Sukkot and has no real scholarly backings should have a short article when it could easily be part of this main Sukkah article. What do others think? IZAK (talk) 08:13, 5 November 2008 (UTC)

I agree with IZAK. There is no real scholarly backing for the phenomenon of sukkah-hopping — if it really is a phenomenon at all. I always thought the term referred to adults doing a tour of visiting their friends, not to children. I think the subject can be neatly inserted into the section about inviting guests into the sukkah, along the lines of:

The custom of inviting guests to the sukkah extends to living guests as well. Many people invite family, friends, neighbours, or people who are alone to join them for a snack or a meal. The practice of "sukkah-hopping" (going from sukkah to sukkah to make a "lesheiv" blessing on cake or cookies in as many sukkahs as possible) is a favorite pastime for some adults. In certain Haredi neighborhoods of Jerusalem, children gather together on each night of Sukkot, shortly after dark, and visit the sukkahs of families which have a member with the same name as the Ushpizin of that night (for example, Abraham on the first night, Isaac on the second, etc.). At each sukkah, they sing a holiday song and receive a candy or other treat for their efforts.

Yoninah (talk) 14:16, 5 November 2008 (UTC)

Absolutely -- merge immediately. DRosenbach (Talk | Contribs) 03:12, 11 November 2008 (UTC)
Definitely merge immediately. Manassehkatz (talk) 03:45, 11 November 2008 (UTC)
Merge. Notable phenomenon, directly related to sukkah. Merge without doubt. JFW | T@lk 11:33, 11 November 2008 (UTC)
Merge. I will proceed to do so. Chesdovi (talk) 12:35, 21 September 2009 (UTC)

Kosher?[edit]

How is the part of the sukkah that isn't underneath the sky not kosher? Or the part that is under the sky kosher? The sukkah isn't eaten, and the word kosher applies to the dietary laws. Is the term 'halakhic' meant? Gavroche42 (talk) 22:41, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

By extension, the broader sense of the word kosher has the meanings legitimate, acceptable, permissible, genuine, or authentic. Chesdovi (talk) 09:00, 2 October 2009 (UTC)
Well answered. Debresser (talk) 13:21, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

Chasidic ushpizin[edit]

User:Chesdovi remarked out the section about the chasidic ushpizin know in Chabad, claiming undue weight. After turning the table into one sentence, and in regard of the fact that Chabad chasidim usually take care that as many Jews as possible should know about their customs and their rebbes' teachings, I think this is not a problem any more. Debresser (talk) 13:55, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

Better photos?[edit]

Can someone upload better inside photos? Like an inside shot of a standard Suka (particularly a long shot), or showing both a modern type (steel/plastic/flat ceiling) and a classical homemade one (makeshift wood beams, branches for ceiling, cloth walls). 82.81.4.8 (talk) 17:40, 23 September 2010 (UTC)

Neighborhood[edit]

In which neighborhood was taken the photo "Sukkot on graded apartment balconies in Jerusalem", that was added to Wikipedia by the user Effib on 08/10/2006 ? 80.230.84.214 (talk) 17:30, 5 November 2012 (UTC)