Talk:Survey

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The Survey[edit]

Hi all. I am doing research for a WWI paper and noticed that even my very bad library has a copy of this publication. I think it's a news magazine (like Time or Newsweek), but I'm not sure.

All I know about it was mostly gathered from here: http://catalog.case.edu/search~S0?/tsurvey/tsurvey/1%2C1396%2C1712%2CB/frameset&FF=tsurvey&7%2C%2C7

192.5.109.34 (talk) 03:16, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

new entry[edit]

If "survey article" is described, shouldn't there be an entry for "survey class" (an introductory overview of a discipline, such as "survey of US history" or "survey of biology")? The article could be brief, but as surveys are a core part of most college curricula (and thus a universal experience for students), the concept should warrant its own article. 165.91.65.23 ([[User talk:16--165.196.0.11 (talk) 17:53, 15 February 2011 (UTC)5.91.65.23|talk]]) 23:16, 18 August 2009 (UTC)RKH

Questionnaire versus survey[edit]

What is the difference between a survey and a questionnaire?

A questionnaire given to a hundred people in order to estimate the views of a thousand similar people is a survey. A questionnaire given to a thousand people to determine their views is a census. That's pretty much it.

Questionaire is used to have an estimation on the total population. Where as survey helps in making good notes on the entire population.

Survey is the general category. A questionnaire is a subset or a particular type (or part) of a survey. - IstvanWolf 02:19, 8 May 2006 (UTC)
I see a survey and a questionnaire as two quite distinct concepts. A survey of people's opinions on current issues would probably use a questionnaire to help ensure that the same questions are asked across interviews, but surveys don't have to involve asking questions. For instance, a survey of the abundance of animals aross a certain region involves observing whether the animals are present, not asking them questions, so a questionnaire isn't needed. -- Avenue 05:04, 8 May 2006 (UTC)

Survey is a term used for when you go about asking questoins e.g favourite bandInsert non-formatted text here —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.136.48.103 (talk) 22:21, 15 December 2007 (UTC)

Yes, but it's also used for when you make observations that do not involve asking questions. -- Avenue (talk) 04:15, 16 December 2007 (UTC)
As an example of this, I might go to a hospital that has medical records for a thousand patients, and randomly select one hundred of these for analysis. This would be a survey, but there's no questionnaire per se.
Even when there is a questionnaire, 'survey' is a broader term - it covers not only the instrument used to collect the data, but processes relating to that collection. (How do you select the people to interview? Are you delivering the questionnaire in person or mailing it out? And so on.) --144.53.251.2 (talk) 00:15, 3 December 2008 (UTC)