Talk:Susanna (Book of Daniel)

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The {} sign/s[edit]

One or more of the sign/s: {{NPOV}}{{expansion}}{{Cleanup}} placed on this page without any discussion, explanation or reasoning have been removed pending further discussion. (The category Category:Bible stories is now up for a vote for deletion at Wikipedia:Categories for deletion#Category:Bible stories) Thank you. IZAK 11:27, 18 Nov 2004 (UTC)

She wasn't a 'maiden'. --ClemMcGann 21:25, 30 August 2005 (UTC)

Susanna an Egyptian borrowing meaning "lily"?[edit]

I believe the Egyptians themselves borrowed it from the Elamites. The Elamite capital was called Susa or Shushan, which means "lily". Eroica 15:20, 12 June 2006 (UTC)

Similar story from Sumerian sources[edit]

The story is quite similar to Sumerian texts: The maiden Ninlil is warned by her mother about Enlil. He forces himself on her and is punished by being sent to the underworld. In another text Inanna is asaulted by the gardener Shukaletuda, he is condemned to death for his crime.

It's fake.[edit]

I remember reading some apocrypha story where Daniel cut some serpent in pieces and moched the Babalonians, saying something like: "Look at the ridiculous things you people worship."

The arrogancy in Daniel's tone reflected that of the catholic bishops, and is inconsistance with the meak and humble character of the Daniel in the rest of the book.

I remember my pastor telling me of some apocrypha story where Jesus was a kid and the priests where telling him not to play in the mud on the Sabbath, so he clapped his hands and the mud turned into doves.

If you believe these fakes, then you believe the whole bible is a fake, and that's probably what the forgers believed.

These attacks on the bible are intended to discredit it, especially the book of Daniel. The early protestand reformers all taught the office of the Pope was the seat of the beast of Revelation and Daniel, so it's no wonder the catholic writers would be in such a hurry to add all these ridiculous stories to make Daniel seem like a fairy tale.

Daniel 8:9-12 And out of one of them came forth a little horn, which waxed exceeding great, toward the south, and toward the east, and toward the pleasant [land].

8:10 And it waxed great, [even] to the host of heaven; and it cast down [some] of the host and of the stars to the ground, and stamped upon them.

8:11 Yea, he magnified [himself] even to the prince of the host, and by him the daily [sacrifice] was taken away, and the place of his sanctuary was cast down.

8:12 And an host was given [him] against the daily [sacrifice] by reason of transgression, and it cast down the truth to the ground; and it practiced, and prospered.

Daniel 7:24-25 And the ten horns out of this kingdom [are] ten kings [that] shall arise: and another shall rise after them; and he shall be diverse from the first, and he shall subdue three kings.

7:25 And he shall speak [great] words against the most High, and shall wear out the saints of the most High, and think to change times and laws: and they shall be given into his hand until a time and times and the dividing of time.

2 Thessalonians 2:4 Who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself that he is God.

Revelation 17:6 And I saw the woman drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus: and when I saw her, I wondered with great admiration.

Rush4hire 03:56, 25 April 2007 (UTC)


redirect[edit]

The talk page for Susanna redirects to here, making it impossible for that article to have its own talk page. Could that be changed? Shoshonna 09:52, 15 May 2007 (UTC)

Enough revisionist etymologies from Wikipedia[edit]

The names Shoshannah and Sasson are both derived from the Hebrew root Shin-Vav-Shin, meaning to be joyful, bright, or cheerful. Sasson literally means "joy". Shoshannah is feminine for Shoshan, which literally means "that which gives joy, brightness". This seems to be the most plausible etymology for the Hebrew lily flower name "shushan". There is no evidence that it was taken from the Egyptian language, which usually finds its way into Hebrew in the case of names of people and places.

J.D. ‚ÄĒPreceding unsigned comment added by 205.68.95.65 (talk) 21:07, 25 January 2008 (UTC)

"early Jewish literature"[edit]

The text may or may not have existed in an Aramaic variant, but it is clear that it was part of the original Septuagint, and was thus part of the tradition of Hellenistic Judaism. The original book of Daniel isn't significantly older than the Septuagint, so there isn't a big difference in age, the text is part of 2nd-century BC Judaism in any case, the question is just whether it was limited to "Hellenistic" Judaism. --dab (ūíĀ≥) 12:32, 12 October 2013 (UTC)