Talk:Swazi language

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The article sez: "There are four dialects being Shiselweni, Hhoho, Nandzini, and Shiselweni"

Shiselweni is two of the four dialects? I think this needs correction, or at the very least, explanation.

The Ethnologue article linked lists the dialects as Baca, Hlubi, Phuthi. The alleged four dialects seem to refer to the four districts of Swaziland, Hhohho, Lubombo, Manzini and Shiselweni (although siSwati is also spoken in adjacent parts of South Africa). -Ahruman 11:24, 10 April 2006 (UTC)

Terminology[edit]

It seems worth mentioning that siSwati is the most common term in English in Swaziland, which is probably where it is most often referred to. -Ahruman 11:27, 10 April 2006 (UTC)

seSwati[edit]

The language is called siSwati in Swaziland, and the whole of Southern Africa, so who cares what it is called in Zulu? Furthermore, siSwati is regarded as a dialect of isiZulu and isiZulu is taught as an official language in schools in Swaziland. The distinction between siSwati and isiZulu is therefore not as large as the distinction between both languages and isiXhosa (which is a separate, but related, language). 89.240.18.84 (talk) 13:05, 9 August 2010 (UTC)

Number of speakers is 1,706,924?[edit]

What's with the bizarre precisely given number of speakers? -- Dissident (Talk) 05:11, 12 August 2006 (UTC)

It's the speaker count given by the Ethnologue, but I agree that it's pretty bizarre to have such a precise number. — mark 08:42, 12 August 2006 (UTC)