Talk:Swedish krona

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WikiProject Numismatics (Rated B-class, High-importance)
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WikiProject Sweden (Rated B-class, High-importance)
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USD Date
10.4381 2002
10.3291 2001
9.1622 2000
8.2624 1999
7.9499 1998
7.6349 1997
6.7060 1996

Template problems[edit]

I tried to add the "Krone" template, but I had trouble to get it right, also I removed the 2kr, because that coin hasn't been used for decades.

I think it would look alright, if we add more text to the article, or make the image of the coin smaller.
The two-crown coin is still fully valid, although it hasn't been minted since 1979. Shouldn't it be mentioned in a list of legal tender coins? (218.228.195.44 09:40, 8 July 2006 (UTC))

Profile image?[edit]

I have a 1988 1 KR coin. The obverse has a profile image of Carl XVI Gustaf, but with a bizzare, oblong gap running down his face. At first I thought the gap was meant to be in the shape of Sweden, but it does not appear to be the case. Anyone know what it represents? Funnyhat 04:03, 17 August 2005 (UTC)

I wondered that when I was a child too. I think it is a design thing, but that's a guess.//Fred-Chess 08:18, 17 October 2005 (UTC)
This coin was designed about 1974. In this era this type of "black-and-white no-grey-scale" design seemed to have been popular. Later coins like 10 kr 1993 and 1 kr 2001 has returned to a more natural look. -- BIL 08:23, 10 April 2007 (UTC)

Caps[edit]

No, you're correct. Names of curriences should not be capitolized, except for the specific country name. You can go to WikiProject Numismatics to see other new and old guidelines. Thnx for your help :) Joe I 00:01, 1 December 2005 (UTC)

2 krona?[edit]

I have never seen a 2 krona, is it valid? That would probably require a source, as it would be very hard to believe for most Swedes. It hasn't been in regular circulation for many decades, and most young Swedes have probably never even seen one. /Grillo 15:28, 22 April 2006 (UTC)

Its not commonly seen, however neither are the jubilee and commemorative coins but they're also legal tender [1]. On a side note, I'm a young Swede and I happen to own two 2-krona coins. I mean it all depends on who you count as being young, sure kids today probably don't remember the 10-krona banknotes or 10-öre coins but most Swedes do. Masken 20:48, 8 May 2006 (UTC)
According to the Swedish central bank, Sveriges Riksbank, the 2 krona is legal tender. // Stora Kogha —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.231.62.204 (talk) 17:00, 11 October 2007 (UTC)
http://www.riksbank.com/templates/Page.aspx?id=15510 // Stora Kogha —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.231.62.204 (talk) 00:57, 6 January 2008 (UTC)

I don't get this sentence: "It is not legal in Sweden to melt down coins that are legal tender, which is why they still are legal.". It seems to say that the coins are still valid because it's illegal to melt valid coins, but that doesn't make sense. Can anyone clarify? 85.228.175.118 (talk) 23:48, 7 January 2011 (UTC)

:-[edit]

Should we add that prices in Sweden are marked ofentimes with ":-" after the price number? Shandristhe azylean 01:29, 7 July 2006 (UTC)

I do think that is adequate information. --Warfvinge 14:14, 21 August 2006 (UTC)
I do too. --anon
Although ":-" is a common way to mark prices, it's not aknowledged by law. Besides there are many more ways to mark a price, such as writing the öres in superscript or by using ",-", ";-" or other similar symbols. There are only two ways to write the currency which are mentioned in the law, and those are "SEK" and "kr". The writing ":-" comes from the old bank checks, where you were supposed to write a sum on the form "kronas:öres", and when there were no öres, that field was just crossed over, thus giving "kronas:-". Today, the writing with ":-" occurs even when the price isn't an even number of kronas. Yenx 13:31, 8 April 2007 (UTC)

As you say Yenx, :- is a way of expressing that there are no öres in the sum. A sum of 50 öres can consequently be weitten as -:50 as it is also done sometimes. Today, the usage of the :- sign when there are öres in the sum is nothing but bad knowledge of the correct way of writing. You never see "big" stores like Åhléns write like that. // Stora Kogha

I sure hope such a thing won't be added to the article. ":-" means "an integer number" and nothing more. It isn't even specific to any individual currency. Prices in the now-obsolete Finnish markka used to be marked that way too in the early 1980s, leading me to think that ":-" was the international symbol for the markka. It didn't take me long to realise it simply meant "an integer number of markkas, with no added pennis". JIP | Talk 20:51, 31 July 2012 (UTC)

Rarity[edit]

What is the rationale for calling the 1000 kr bill rare? Where I live it is definitely used, not as much as the other bills but still much more than the 2 kr coin that the article also define as rare. Isn't it more stringent to call the 1000 bill frequent? --Warfvinge 14:11, 21 August 2006 (UTC)

I'm no expert on Swedish afair. But I am the designer of the infobox template. There is a similar discussion at Talk:United States dollar where I explained the rationale. But I didn't write the specific information for Swedish krone. You must ask yourself these questions
  1. What do ATMs give?
  2. If someone pays something worth several thousand kronor, with cash, is it more likely with a few 1000 krona notes, or with 500 krona notes?
--Chochopk 18:48, 21 August 2006 (UTC)
Appears to be a reasonable definition. And it places the 1000 bill among the rare notes. Thanks! --Warfvinge 19:11, 21 August 2006 (UTC)
That definition is rubbish since statistics are available - "The denomination that dominates in terms of quantity of notes in circulation is the 100-kronor note; at the end of 2005/beginning of 2006 there were just over 96 million of these in circulation. This is followed by the 500-kronor note, with almost 94 million and the 20-kronor note with around 83 million. There were around 45 million 1,000-kronor notes in circulation and just over 25 million 50-kronor notes" (http://www.riksbank.com/templates/Page.aspx?id=10892) By the way, the 1000-kronor notes are widely used in the black market and they are also hoarded in order to avoid wealth tax. Masken 20:51, 25 August 2006 (UTC)
Those statistics may be a little bit misleading though. Something that points in that direction is the notion in the article on the use of 10 and 5 kronor notes which the numbers "claim" are as widely spread as the 50-kronor note. Something that every Swede knows is completely wrong. My understanding is that rarity should reflect how often an average Swedish citizen uses or sees a certain note, not how many notes there are in actual numbers. The numbers do not reflect how many bills are stores in foreign countries, vaults or old peoples mattresses and how many are used in the everyday-lives of the people. --Warfvinge 12:13, 26 August 2006 (UTC)

I concur with Warfvinge. I am not denying the value of the numbers in absolute quantity. It's just a different piece of information. Neither is "rubbish". --Chochopk 15:46, 26 August 2006 (UTC)

About Swedish notes: 100 and 500 SEK notes, but no other denominations, are given by cash machines. 20 and 50 SEK notes are not given by cash machines, but are commonly given as change in shops. 1000 SEK notes are rarely used at all. You can exchange other notes for them at banks if you wish, and they are commonly given to people exchanging large amounts of foreign currency at exchange offices. If you pay large amounts of 1000 SEK or above, it seems to be more common to pay with lots of 500 SEK notes, although most people would pay using a card or bank transfer. The black market likes the 1000 SEK notes, though. (218.228.195.44 04:22, 6 November 2006 (UTC))

This is very useful information. Thank you, 218.228.195.44. The data you provide matches the existing data in infobox. --ChoChoPK (球球PK) (talk | contrib) 04:50, 6 November 2006 (UTC)

As working in a grocery store in Sweden I can say that it is not uncommon to get 1,000 SEK notes from costumers. And if I were to pay a large amount of money (like 5,000 or 10,000 SEK) I think I would have it in 1,000 SEK notes. There are bank offices as well, not only cash machines, and they are glad to help you. And got a 1,000 SEK note as a Christmas present three weeks ago, so don't say that they are uncommon. // Stora Kogha (user name on Swedish Wikipedia)

1000 SEK notes are very common when buying high priced items like cars. When withdrawing money in excess of 3-5k SEK from your bank the cashier will often give you 1000 SEK notes as part of the bundle unless you instruct otherwise. In short, anyone that has a job and doesn't live completely off plastic will use 1000 SEK bills semi-regularly. That does not qualify for rare in my world, but it's hard to tell what the definition of rare is in this discussion. // Sweanon

10.000 kr banknote?[edit]

From 1958 to 1991 there was a 10.000 kronor banknote in circulation. Very rare, but still around. It is said that it was discontinued because it was the banknote with the highest value in the world. http://www.janeriks.no/Banknotes/scand/sw/P56.jpg —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 193.10.185.3 (talkcontribs) 23:27, 24 August 2006 (UTC)

http://www.riksbank.com/templates/Page.aspx?id=15368 Masken 20:42, 25 August 2006 (UTC)
It cannot be the highest. There was a 10000 Malaya and British Borneo dollar note issued in 1953. At that time it was equal to 1166 British pound. In the late 50's and early 60's, 1 pound = 14.485 SEK. One of the successors of Malaya and British Borneo dollar, Singapore dollar, still has 10000 dollars today. And it is the highest non-commemorative banknote. --Chochopk 15:46, 26 August 2006 (UTC)
It was withdrawn because it was easy to counterfeit. It was not replaced since with transfer between banks, cheques etc such large cash amounts are not needed. Criminals like these types of money since they want untracable money. There were 10.000 kr banknotes also before 1958, partly used to transfer money between banks, which is not done in cash anymore but with accounts in the Riksbank. -- BIL 08:31, 10 April 2007 (UTC)

account convertibility[edit]

i think it would be a good idea to add som info on account convertibility of the krona..the currency is a floating currency and is subject to market movements unlike some of the pegged currencies like the indonesia rupiah. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 220.224.6.73 (talk) 09:08, 5 January 2007 (UTC).

I don't think the Indonesian rupiah is pegged. --ChoChoPK (球球PK) (talk | contrib) 21:18, 5 January 2007 (UTC)
It's a deliberate choice by the Swedish government. EU would like Sweden to peg their currency to the Euro. 惑乱 分からん 12:05, 6 January 2007 (UTC)

Missing Image[edit]

In the info box, the "The back of a 1 krona coin" image is missing - should I delete, or did something happen to it, or what? 65.95.188.182 22:37, 15 January 2007 (UTC)

Fixed. --ChoChoPK (球球PK) (talk | contrib) 11:36, 16 January 2007 (UTC)

how much?[edit]

how much is one krona worth in USA dollars?

209.244.43.57 22:16, 28 April 2007 (UTC) an interested person

About 1/8th or 1/9th, I think. Anyway, such information changes quickly, and that's why the Wikipedia articles concerning currency generally feature direct links to current exchange rates. 惑乱 分からん * \)/ (\ (< \) (2 /) /)/ * 16:38, 1 May 2007 (UTC)

Large 20 krona note in table[edit]

Why do I think it is necessary to include it in the table even though BIL says it’s no longer legal. Ultimately, currency articles should contain information about all current as well as historical notes/coins. We're not there yet. But we're working toward it. Banknotes of the Romanian leu is one example. So when there are more data, the individual notes should be sectioned by series. Both the large and small 20 krona notes belong to the same (current) series. It certainly does not belong to the 1963-1986 series (Those are P50 ~ P56 at here). So both of them should be included in the current table. I also changed the wording to be accurate. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Chochopk (talkcontribs) 08:52, 13 May 2007 (UTC).

Dead link to reference[edit]

"Notwithstanding this, on 2003-09-14, a consultative Swedish referendum was held on the euro, in which 56% of voters were opposed to the adoption of the currency, out of an overall turnout of approximately 80%(according to the BBC) [1]."

There's a link to a reference on the BBC. However, the link points nowhere. Maybe Valmyndigheten's website would be a better source? There it says that the overall turnout was 82.6%. (Stefan2 19:43, 5 June 2007 (UTC))

Commemorative coins[edit]

Discuss at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Numismatics#Rarely used coins -- commemorative coins.3F. (Stefan2 19:45, 5 June 2007 (UTC))

Ören[edit]

The article says "The plural form is kronor and one krona is divided into 100 öre (singular and plural, if not preceded by a number the plural becomes ören)." I've lived in Sweden my entire life and have never seen or heard this usage. Who says "femtio ören" rather than "femtio öre"? This must be archaic. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.237.196.175 (talk) 13:57, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

I've removed this reference. What must have been meant is that the definite plural (the plural form for "the öre") is ören but, as we don't give the definite singular (öret), there's no need to give the definite plural.
Dove1950 20:14, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

Well, it's "100 öre", but in some cases you use "ören" (cf. "kronor och ören", "några öre(n)" and so on).

I've lived in Sweden my entire life and have never seen or heard this usage. Who says "femtio ören" rather than "femtio öre"?

It said "if not preceded by a number the plural becomes ören" but in your example it was preceded by a number. So the example isn't valid.

What must have been meant is that the definite plural (the plural form for "the öre") is ören

No, no, that's "örena"! See, for example, [2] where the plural "ören" is used. (Stefan2 18:27, 12 July 2007 (UTC))

And on the coin tubes that stores get from the bank it says "50-ören". Ören is right as said above. / SK

50 öre is an amount of money. A 50 öre coin traditionally is called "50-öring". A tube of coins should be labeled "50-öringar", but maybe some bank found that not strict style enough, since "50-öringar" is somewhat of child language, its the childrens type of money. Google gives 407 hits for "50-ören" and 1160 hits for "50-öringar". -- 81.230.2.149 (talk) 20:33, 16 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Swedish banknotes.jpg[edit]

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BetacommandBot (talk) 07:33, 15 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Swedish krona.jpg[edit]

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Image:Swedish krona.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 07:33, 15 January 2008 (UTC)

¼ and ½ krona[edit]

What's the source for the ¼ and ½ krona denomination? I can't find any info about that classification ever being used in practice. See http://www.jpedersen.se/svmynt_2.asp for photographs on older coins. Reverting to 25 öre and 50 öre until source. 惑乱 Wakuran (talk) 03:08, 9 December 2008 (UTC)

I have only ever heard people talking of the coins as "25-öringar" and "50-öringar" (and occasionally as "12-skillingar" and "24-skillingar": one Swedish dollar was divided into 48 shillings). On all coins I've seen (including some really old ones), it always says "25 öre" and "50 öre". On the other hand, fractions are used on the ½ öre coins. (212.247.11.156 (talk) 19:40, 7 March 2009 (UTC))
Oh, yeah, these coins. =S Probably since they aren't any lower denomination(?) They're not legal tender anymore, though, although I guess they might come in handy for buying rice seeds... 惑乱 Wakuran (talk) 20:13, 2 April 2009 (UTC)

Åland[edit]

In Åland kronor are used only by the wish of the recepients, t.ex. shops, hotels etc. It can not be named unofficial currency of Åland as it is not used everywhere. --Dima1 (talk) 12:16, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

When I visited Mariehamn last year, some places wrote prices in both euros and crowns, but I think I only saw that at tourist places, such as hotels and museums. Don't know about other places. I used cash in euros and my Visa card everywhere. (212.247.11.156 (talk) 10:21, 24 May 2009 (UTC))
It's certainly only at tourist places. If you tried to pay in kronor in e.g. a main food supermarket, you wouldn't get very far. Tourist books always seem to belief the krona is accepted more generally than it in fact is on Åland. 78.86.27.49 (talk) 00:58, 16 January 2010 (UTC)

When I was in Mariehamn in July this year, all shops, including main food supermarkets, indicated the price in crowns on all receipts I got. However, it was not entirely clear if they would all accept crowns or if they just mentioned an amount of crowns on the receipt so as to be helpful for Swedish tourists. On the other hand, it always seems to be cheaper to pay in euros, even if you need to convert crowns to euros before the purchase. (Stefan2 (talk) 09:07, 9 September 2011 (UTC))

Yahoo doesn't convert SEK[edit]

There is a line with links to yahoo's currency converters for converting SEK to several other currencies. The thing is that you cannot convert neither to or from SEK on Yahoo's currency converter. I remove the whole line for now. 85.228.51.115 (talk) 12:05, 31 May 2009 (UTC)

As far as I know, there is a common agreement that the currency conversion template is supposed to be placed on all currency pages. If you want it removed, please first discuss this at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Numismatics. Also note that the Yahoo link works perfectly as long as you have switched on JavaScript. (212.247.11.156 (talk) 19:58, 2 June 2009 (UTC))

Magnetic 5 kronor?[edit]

Hi, Just a personal curiosity, but I noticed the inside portion of a 5 kronor is 100% Nickel! Has anybody tried picking one up with a magnet? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dgroseth (talkcontribs) 02:33, 2 July 2009 (UTC)

Oops forgot to sign, distracted at the time SineBot is quick! --Dgroseth (talk) 02:37, 2 July 2009 (UTC)

I was bored, so I tried it out with a reasonably strong fridge magnet. For a 5 kr coin, it works very well, for a 1 kr, not at all, I don't have a 10 kr or 50 öre available, right now. 惑乱 Wakuran (talk) 14:13, 18 March 2010 (UTC)

"öre (discontinued)"[edit]

It says "öre (discontinued)" in the toolbox. I'm not sure how accurate this is; while you certainly can't use öre coins for cash payments, there is nothing preventing me from using them for non-cash payments. Shouldn't this be changed? (Stefan2 (talk) 09:09, 9 September 2011 (UTC))

I agree. The 'öre' isn't discontinued. There just aren't any coins or bills. /81.170.148.21 (talk) 23:40, 3 February 2012 (UTC)

commemorative coins?[edit]

There reads: all jubilee and commemorative coins minted in 1897 or later are also legal tender
Well, where are they? I thought there's normally an article about those. 85.217.46.149 (talk) 15:33, 9 July 2012 (UTC)

SEK weakening 2008-2009[edit]

This section is wrong

" but from the second half 2008, the value of the krona has declined by around 20%, and had been oscillating between 10.4–11 SEK per EUR into the first half of 2009.[citation needed] The primary reason for its declining value lies with the Riksbank, which has significantly lowered the interest rate, and has not acted to defend the exchange rate yet.[citation "


The primary reason was the global fincancial crise which made investors sell smaller currencies like SEK and NOK in favour of major currencies, sk "safe-havens" NOK saw a similar weakening without lower rates. SEK Rates are much lower now than in 2008, still the SEK is much stronger now — Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.255.43.133 (talk) 08:52, 31 January 2013 (UTC)

Lack of images on contemporary notes[edit]

I noticed that there is only 3 out of 10 images of the current banknotes in the Swedish krona#Banknotes#Contemporary notes section. Is there any particular reason for that, or is it just that no one have uploaded any? If so, can I take a picture on them myself, add the specimen text and then upload? Or does that count as counterfeiting? --Christoffre (talk) 14:44, 16 January 2014 (UTC)