Talk:Swedish popular music

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ABBA's UK ALBUM SALES[edit]

 You cannot work out an Artists Sales by using Sales Awards. You nearly always end up with too low a total. ABBA have sold
far more than 7,160,000 UK Albums. It is more like 17,000,000. 'ABBA Gold' alone has sold 5,100,000 in the UK, & 'Greatest
Hits' (1976), sold over 2,600,000. The reason why Swedish 'Rock' Artists are not mentioned in the Article is because hardly
any of them sold records outside of Sweden. In the UK, we like ABBA best,(as regards Swedish Acts), & that is why we bought
over 11 Million ABBA Singles, & 17 Million ABBA Albums. It is not ABBA's fault that Swedish Rock Acts mean very little
outside Sweden!  In the 1970's, & early 1980's, a UK Album could only get one Platinum Sales Award, no matter how many times
it sold enough to go Platinum - 300,000. So ABBA's 8 UK No.1 Albums, from 1976 to 1982, only have 8 Awards between them. In
fact, they earned far more Awards than that, but were only allowed 1 each. So, if you use their UK Sales Awards, you only get
a total of 2,400,000 UK Sales for them all - combined. But, 'Greatest Hits' alone sold more than that - over 2,600,000. Hence
why you cannot work out Album, (or Singles), Sales by adding up Sales Awards. It does not work. 86.13.2.211 (talk) 12:13, 21 July 2013 (UTC) 

AoL[edit]

Hello, I cant believe you guys didn't write anything about Army of Lovers!!?!!??! They are one of the greatest Swedish bands ever, way bigger and more popular than most of the mentioned singers/bands in the article! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.193.33.42 (talk) 06:23, 7 October 2008 (UTC)

No prog?[edit]

They've got Opeth, Anekdoten, Änglagård and Landberk, to name just a few. More than enough to have some sort of section regarding Sweden's take and influences on the progressive genre.

Pop acts only[edit]

Horrible! Pretty much all that's mentioned here (in the sections up till 2000 at least) is pop acts and has zero relevance to a history of Swedish rock - in a wide sense. ABBA, Roxette and Ace of Base were pop acts, plus they were not particularly acclaimed among young rock/pop musicians at the time they were active. ABBA sold as much records in Sweden as anywhere else but it was definitely not considered cool to like them in 1970s Sweden, not among progressive rockers, nor among punks or hard rockers/blues guys or even clubbers (the native *pop* scene, as in bubblegum and glam pop with playful English lyrics, was pretty much nonexistent in those years apart from ABBA who barely toured in their home country post 1976/77). They really became iconic here only long after they had disbanded.

A-Teens?!? UGH!!! *rolls eyes*

Europe - yeah, a semi-hard rock band ("poodle rockers" we call them here - the hairdos and stuffed up guitar breaks). Huge for a few years in the 80s, but no serious hard rock fans today would say they're on a par with Candlemass, Opeth or Entombed.

Björn Skifs ("Blue Swede") - okay, he's a '60s-70s rocker, but "Hooked On A Feeling" was a one-off and it's not very typical of most of what he does. It's known in Swreden today precisely because it hit the Billboard top spot. Few people under 50 would claim Björn Skifs is a major rock figure - look for Ulf Lundell, Kent, The Soundtrack Of Our Lives, The Hives or Backyard Babies instead!

I came to this page on a redirect link of "Swedish rock" - that could explain some of the violent dismay. But the page is pretty useless if it's supposed to discuss acts that have moulded Swedish pop music too. It's only about Swedish bands that made it abroad in a big or small way - those are often not the artists that have had a defining influence at home. Robert Broberg, Mauro Scocco, Thomas di Leva, Anders F Rönnblom, Eva Dahlgren, Rob'N'Raz, Christian Falk and Jakob Hellman have meant so much more than A-Teens, Denniz Pop or Roxette. /Strausszek (talk) 00:07, 29 September 2009 (UTC)


In Flames should be somewhere on here.... --69.125.2.186 (talk) 05:32, 25 January 2010 (UTC)

Swedish-language pop music[edit]

I am also interested in English information on Swedish language pop music such as Dromhus. --ssr (talk) 11:00, 16 October 2009 (UTC)

Swedish heavy metal scene[edit]

I added a few sentences on swedish heavy metal as Sweden is a big producer of many important heavy metal bands, mainly death metal. Feel free to edit, contribute etc. Im totaly new at this and just thought it at least should be mentioned. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.248.248.226 (talk) 12:33, 30 March 2011 (UTC)