Talk:Swiss cuisine

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WikiProject Switzerland (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
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Explanations[edit]

sorry but where are the explanations what the food mentionend actually is? As a Swiss I might know what a "Fotzel Slice" really is but a foreigner will get no idea out of this article. The same goes for all the other dishes mentionend. Unfortunatly I don't have the time to make addings to the article but this is an area where it clearly needs some improvement. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.227.148.217 (talk) 23:05, 7 December 2007 (UTC)

Cleanup[edit]

This article seems to be poorly written for the encyclopedic nature of Wikipedia. More detailed information on the foods listed, and less of a marketing tone "Try this cake made with chestnut puree." I've added the general Cleanup Template.

--207.28.1.74 20:04, 31 October 2007 (UTC)

Appaled to find there was no such article, here's a stub to build on. I've mostly collected the articles already on Wikipedia and wrapped them into some sort of text. Would be nice if some others could fill the gaps etc. Kokiri 09:15, 23 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Dear Swiss Wikipedistas, please improve this article! For example, there are several sentences explaining how "Fotzel slices" are frugal meal using leftover bread, but not a word about what is it, actually. We know that "Cut meat, Zürich style" is often served with Rösti, but not what is it (I know, more or less, because I just saw the recipe on Croatian TV :) ). --bonzi (talk) 06:52, 10 September 2008 (UTC)

I am very sorry about the state of the article. (I did try once to improve it, but my participation was found not good enough, not to be erased as apparently my level of knowledge (not interest, as I love food) is not high enough to venture into this matter. I leave it to my friends who have established the article in the first place. Enough to do with horology and interesting places around my area and Switzerland.

Fotzel slices: quoted from [1] : Swiss recipes Heritage

"Fotzel slices: Nobody really knows how this dish got its name. Fotzel means a torn-off scrap of paper. But in Basel dialect it means a suspicious individual, or a ne'er-do-well... Our grandmothers used to use stale bread to make fotzel slices, which made it an ideal recipe for homemakers accustomed to the rule: "Never throw any bread away.""

Switzerland has not always been a so called "rich" country :-) . Especially now again, many familes encounter difficulties to make ends meet and the preparation of left-overs is coming back on the families' tables.

Best regards claude (talk) 22:46, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

Birchermüesli[edit]

"but this has been replaced by the muesli, which is commonly eaten for breakfast and in Switzerland goes by the name of "Birchermüesli"" Birchermüesli is not a name for muesli, rather it is a breakfast dish that has muesli as one of it's ingredients, the others being yoghurt, cream and fruits. A Birchermüsli is the total combination of what you know as "müsii" mixed togegher with yoghurt and or cream and fruits claude (talk) 22:27, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

What's "Pizokel with cabbage?"[edit]

the text mentions "Pizokel with cabbage" but there's nothing about what that might be - can anyone add some explanation? Pgilman (talk) 21:07, 24 September 2009 (UTC) Each family in Graubünden has its own recipe for Pizokel. The dough is based on buckwheat flour, white flour, milk, water and eggs. This pasta does not really belong to the family “knöpfli or spätzli » as their shape is like short and white noodles. Pizokel are served with a wide variety of vegetables, meat, and sauce. In the above case, the Pizokel are served with cabbage, prepared in an individual way. claude (talk) 22:29, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

Official languages[edit]

Swiss German is no official language. It's the everyday language, indeed, but not official. (High) German is. Primusinterparem (talk) 16:30, 18 February 2010 (UTC)

More typical Swiss meals[edit]

Further typical (German) Swiss meals are:

- Spätzli (egg noodles; derives from Southern Germany (Spätzle), but is very popular and traditional in German Switzerland, too.)
- Bratwurst (traditional veal, pork or beef sausage, always served on events, parties, festivals, etc. It's often served with mustard and farmer bread)
- Landjäger (Dried sausage made with beef, pork, lard, sugar, and spices)
- Braetzeli (a wafer-thin cookie with an almond-vanilla taste)
- cheese cake

Further Swiss Italian meals:

- Risotto (rice with mushrooms and pieces of sausage)
- Grissini (Breadsticks)

Another typical French Swiss meal:

- Saucisse d'Ajoie: spicey sausage from the canton of Jura.

Another typical meal from Graubünden:

- Capuns (egg noodles in chard leaves)

Primusinterparem (talk) 16:42, 18 February 2010 (UTC)