Talk:Symbolic system

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Sociology (Rated Stub-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sociology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Sociology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Anthropology (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Anthropology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Anthropology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject Typography (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Typography, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles related to Typography on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
 

Cut text[edit]

The following was cut (WP:UNDUE, WP:ADV). If you can find a use for it, most likely in the context of a section on academic courses in general, with citations, feel free to add it back.

"===Symbolic Systems at Stanford===

Stanford University's Symbolic Systems Program (SSP) is one of the leading academic programs devoted to the study of these unique symbol-based systems. The program includes world-class interdisciplinary faculty from a variety of departments, including Computer Science, Linguistics, Psychology, Philosophy, Communication, and Education. The program focuses on computers and minds: artificial and natural systems that use symbols to represent information. SSP brings together students and faculty interested in different aspects of the human-computer relationship, including:

  • cognitive science: studying human intelligence, natural languages, and the brain as computational processes;
  • artificial intelligence: endowing computers with human-like behavior and understanding; and
  • human-computer interaction: designing computer software and interfaces that work well with human users.

The program was originally founded by Tom Wasow, currently the Clarence Irving Lewis Professor in Philosophy and Chair of Linguistics."