Talk:Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse

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Untitled[edit]

  • In the National Championships section, Syracuse is shown as having a national title in 1920 (USILA Champions),

1922 (USILA Champions), 1924 (USILA Champions), 1925 (USILA Champions). United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association has Syracuse listed as USILA champ in 1922 & 1924, but not 1920 & 1925. Navy is shown as the USILA champ in these years. It looks like this list was derived from Hickoksports - http://www.hickoksports.com/history/ncamlacr.shtml - and that the USILAs own site doesn't have a list of champions. Could someone produce a reference check that Syracuse was USILA champion or co-champion (or perhaps ILA champ) in 1920 & 1925? I couldn't find any such reference. Thanks. --10stone5 (talk) 18:23, 29 July 2008 (UTC)

Thanks for your message. [1] This is my source. It lists Syracuse as co-champions in 1920 and 1925. Please let me know if you need anything else. Chengwes (talk) 00:31, 30 July 2008 (UTC)

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Ten Championships[edit]

I don't think we should count 1990. At least not with out an asterisk such as this one. Official sources still have it as nine championships. I don't want to wound anyone's pride, but I just think it's misleading to have that as the summary on the Syracuse Orange article and in the intro here. Unless there's a reason not to, I'll later change it and add sources.--Patrick «» 07:42, 17 December 2008 (UTC)

I completely understand your reasoning here, and I think its the right thing to do. However, I feel that your wording could be misleading. In the Syracuse Orange Lax article, your wording is: "nine national championships, tied for the most of any team in college lacrosse history, with one championship later vacated." To those not knowing the whole history and not clicking on the ref link it could very easily be interpreted that the team has rightfully won only eight championships. Perhaps we should say the team has won ten championship games, with one of those being later vacated by the NCAA. What do you think? -Darry2385 (talk) 11:46, 17 December 2008 (UTC)
There was also some discussion about this topic here: Talk:NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship#Syracuse championships. There we decided to say: "10th victory in a national championship game for the Syracuse program" regarding the 2008 game, with a note discussing the vacated title. FYI -Mitico (talk) 13:09, 17 December 2008 (UTC)
Thats exactly what I was thinking, thanks Mitico. -Darry2385 (talk) 13:26, 17 December 2008 (UTC)


The notion that the 1990 championship is in valid is ridiculous. The NCAA rules "infraction" had nothing to do with lacrosse, sports, or money. Coach Simmons' wife co-signed a car loan for Gary Gait. There was no transfer or exchange of funds or favoritism. Even by the stnadards of the NCAA's ridiculous rules, this one is a stretch. Loyola refused to accept being called the champion, so the SU title stands. It was settled on the field, fair and square. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ruggerjvd (talkcontribs) 17:57, 28 May 2009 (UTC)

Actually, it was Paul Gait, and it may have even been his wife. The point remains, however. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.235.133.147 (talk) 04:20, 3 June 2010 (UTC)

Venues?[edit]

Where did the Orange(men) play prior to the Carrier Dome? At Archbold Stadium? Or? Thanks, DA Sonnenfeld (talk) 16:22, 31 December 2013 (UTC)

Donald Fisher's Lacrosse: A History of the Game mentions SU lacrosse being played in "Hendricks Field" in the 1950s (p.220). DA Sonnenfeld (talk) 10:15, 2 June 2014 (UTC)
For a bit of further information on Hendricks Field, see: Talk:Syracuse Orange baseball#Hendricks Field. Anyone have an old photo? Thanks, DA Sonnenfeld (talk) 22:14, 5 June 2014 (UTC)

Early history[edit]

A few notes from the early history of SU men's lacrosse, from Donald Fisher's (2002) text:

  • "Official play [as a club sport] began in November 1906" (p.81)
  • The team was called the "Rangers", and was "mentored" by SU hockey coach Robert Hilliard, among others (ibid.)
  • Under early coach Laurie D. Cox, a professor of landscape architecture at the New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse University, many of the players on the lacrosse team also were from the College of Forestry; the team at that time may have been referred to as the "Foresters". (pp.170-171)

Regards, DA Sonnenfeld (talk) 10:27, 2 June 2014 (UTC)