Talk:Syrup

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Is syrup any viscous fluid as pargraph one says or only a sugar water solution as paragraph 2 says? Rmhermen 21:33, Sep 17, 2003 (UTC)

it doesnt add up[edit]

"one pound of granulated sugar must be gradually stirred into 13 ounces of hot water in a sauce pan. This makes 16 ounces of simple syrup." 86.31.99.139 23:55, 17 June 2006 (UTC)

Not that the math above is specifically correct, but it shouldn't add up. When you dissolve a solute into a solvent, the resulting solution will typically (always?) have a volume less than the sum of its parts. Another pair of factors to consider if you're in the lab are evaporation and boiling - some of the volume of solvent (water) will be lost to the atmosphere.

Does "16 ounces of simple syrup" relate to volume or weight? Anyway one pound of suger + 13 ounces of water would seem to need a lot of evaporation to leave 16 ounces [certainly if weight] of solution, particuarly as the water is only described as hot, not boiling? Could someone at least rewrite in SI units! 86.31.105.179 23:23, 5 July 2006 (UTC)

Sugar dissolved into water is considerably more dense at a molecular level, thus it takes up less volume. I recently made a syrup with 3 cups of sugar and 3 cups of water that yielded just over 4 cups of syrup. BeboGuitar 18:16, 4 January 2007 (UTC)

"The precise USP (United States Pharmacopia) receipe for simple syrup is 850 grams of sucrose to 450 ml water, yielding 1 liter (67.6 fl oz) of syrup." (Source: http://www.truetex.com/carbonation.htm) I'm not sure what the proper protocol for adding that to the article is, but there are your SI units. Hencethus 21:10, 23 July 2006 (UTC)

Personally, I always use a 2:1 sugar to water ratio by volume to make my simple syrup. Hencethus 14:44, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

molecular formula of sucrose syrup?[edit]

Dissolving something into water is essentially a chemical reaction that alters the molecular structure, no? I'm not a chemistry buff, so I'm not entirely sure that this is right, but I know that dissolving CO2 into H2O yields H2CO3, aka carbonic acid or seltzer water.

So what happens when sucrose (C12H22O11) is dissolved into water (H2O)?

I'd guess that it looks something like this: C12H22O11 + H2O ⇌ C12H24O12

But that's just a guess, and not a very educated one at that. Does anyone know what the formula looks like and how the molecules are structured?

Hencethus 15:04, 24 July 2006 (UTC)

I think perhaps this is a little bit more complicated than I thought. I think I can infer from the article on carbonic acid that seltzer water is actually an amalgam of H2O, CO2, and H2CO3, i.e., the solution isn't a uniform collection of H2CO3 molecules. However, the article on carbonated water contradicts this and clearly states that carbonic acid and carbonated water are synonymous.

I'm sorry if this doesn't seem like it has much to do with syrup. I'm just using seltzer water because it's analogous to my question about sucrose syrup.

Hencethus 15:17, 24 July 2006 (UTC)


Gomme Syrup confusion[edit]

The article states, as I read it, that gomme syrup is a supersaturated sugar syrup. This idea may come from later editions of Jerry Thomas's "How To Mix Drinks," which includes a recipe for gomme syrup at around 14 pounds of sugar to around 1.2 gallons of water. However, the first edition of this book does not have a gomme syrup recipe, but instead includes a "Manual for the Manufacture of Cordials, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, &c, &c." by one Christian Schultz. This manual specifies a recipe for "sirop de gomme" as having 20 pounds of *gum arabic* along with 60 pounds of sugar and 5 gallons of water. Both will make quite a saturated syrup, of course, but more to the point: I have always understood that the thing that distinguishes gomme syrup from simple syrup at any concentration is the inclusion of gum arabic.

Also, for what it's worth... the article says that "generally, a ratio of two parts sugar to one part water is used" for simple syrup. In a professional setting, I would say that this is not the case. Many bars nowadays are using 1:1 (by volume) simple syrup because it does not need to be heated. slk 19:44, 8 April 2007 (UTC)

Simple syrup proportions[edit]

In both the New American Cook Book, Lily Wallace, published by Books, Inc. in 1952 and in the Standard Home Library's The Family Cook Book, Gertrude Wilkinson, 1962 edition, the proportions are equal and heated for 5 minutes without stirring. Gertrude Wilkerson's book specifies to refrigerate the cooled syrup, while Lily Wallace merely says 'store in a cool place'.

I have not found a credible source that gives the shelf life of simple syrup. Mwrloggie (talk) 21:43, 10 August 2008 (UTC)Mwrloggie

Ratios by weight or volume?[edit]

For simple syrup it specifies a ratio of 1:1 to 1:2, it doesn't say whether the ratio is by weight or by volume, which would make a significant difference.75.82.133.73 (talk) 23:49, 11 August 2009 (UTC)

Traditionally in cooking, almost all measuring is done by volume (even in cases where it would benefit one to measure by weight: flour's density can vary quite a bit, but i'd say 95% of people never weigh their flour), so I think it probably doesn't NEED to be specified, though I agree it should. I know for a fact that the ratios are for volume, but don't have a citation/source for that, sorry. -Indalcecio (talk) 06:03, 16 February 2010 (UTC)