Talk:Talk show

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Oprah is family oriented?[edit]

A whole lot more than Jerry Springer or Maury Povich.  :) --Modemac 11:40, 20 Apr 2005 (UTC)


Different Kinds of Talk Shows[edit]

A tabloid talkshow is where they cover gossip and stuff, a talkshow covers politics or anything, thus two wikis is adaquet. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 69.179.26.32 (talk) 17:59, 28 December 2006 (UTC).

This page should have the types of talk shows for example like mentioned above, tabloid talkshows, political talkshows, etc.

Talk show vs chat show[edit]

I was under the impression "chat show" referred specifically to the celebrity-interview format rather than the Springer-format. Am I wrong? --Dtcdthingy 00:07, 23 October 2005 (UTC)

Hi Dtcdthingy, do you mean in British English or American English? We Yanks call these shows "talk shows" collectively. Telestylo 09:33, 23 October 2005 (UTC)
Sorry, I mean in British English. I don't think the British vs US, caht show vs talk show distinction stated in the article is right. --Dtcdthingy 08:47, 21 January 2006 (UTC)

Apparent Hoax[edit]

I removed Charles Jefferson as it is an apparent hoax. --Jeremy Butler 16:46, 2 November 2005 (UTC)

Radio vs. TV[edit]

Needs list of radio talk shows as well? --AndyBoySouthPas 14:34, 19 July 2006 (UTC)

Talk vs chat vs discussion - again[edit]

As this issue has just come up again, might I add that our (British) company has produced chat shows (lighter in approach) and talk shows (heavier) and discussion programmes/shows (heaviest). At least that's the way we use the jargon. So some claims made for British English - see recent edits - are not quite right. AnOpenMedium (talk) 17:02, 17 June 2008 (UTC)

Well if a Talk Show and a Chat Show are two seperate things then why not create a new article for a 'Chat Show'. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Romance733 (talkcontribs) 19:40, 17 June 2008 (UTC)

Apologies if my comment suggested clear distinctions: I was trying to say the exact opposite, i.e. these are jargon terms, with fluid boundaries, here's an example from a British company which does not match a recent edit comment about use in Britain.
One practical way forward would be to call the page Talk Shows and begin the lead with the sentence Sometimes known as Chat Shows or Discussion Programmes". A short disambiguation page would complete this approach. The reality is that some chat shows are also discussion programmes but some aren't, and so on round the (very loosely defined and not just culturally/linguistically) three designations. Hope that helps. AnOpenMedium (talk) 06:59, 19 June 2008 (UTC)
I moved Talk/Chat show back to Talk show. This article may be titled as Talk show or Chat show. Either way is fine because all national varieties of English spelling are acceptable. See Wikipedia:Naming conventions (use English)#National varieties of English. But please don't use slash like Talk/Chat show as the title. It is not a solution. --Neo-Jay (talk) 18:52, 13 September 2008 (UTC)

If chat show is a global term and talk show an American term why have the article named after the American one? I would have thought that there were more people outside the boundaries of the US than inside... perhaps entitling the article "chat show" would therefore be more neutral and inclusive of all boundaries whilst serving also, in a way that has suitable reason to back up its argument, to end this farce once and for all? --86.40.200.100 (talk) 02:41, 28 September 2008 (UTC) do you know Chow libo? a shanghai talk show actor?

The Mike Wallace Interview[edit]

Can you tell me why you are missing out on this interesting one?

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/collections/film/holdings/wallace/ —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.91.216.153 (talk) 14:16, 11 August 2009 (UTC)

List?[edit]

Why does List of talk shows redirect here if there isn't a list of talk shows here? I see it was removed for being "trivia"... You realize I came here specifically looking for a neatly arranged list of talk shows, like there was for sitcoms? One person's "trivia" is another person's invaluable information... - Keolah (talk) 15:43, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

Agree. Maybe you could create a new page called "List of Talk Shows". Alternatively - for your own research - you could use [[1]] AnOpenMedium (talk) 08:20, 2 June 2010 (UTC)

how the heck can johny carson not be mentioned, especially with the obvious mention of the leno show * admittedly it began as a variety show but the man literally became an american icon * for better or worse * he was a uniquely * repeat * uniquely * nice person * especially in this feild that came to dominated by bozos * 24.213.227.27 (talk) 21:13, 25 August 2010 (UTC)grumpy

Origin of "Talk Show"[edit]

When was the very expression "Talk Show" introduced the first time? Since when is it in common use and who did coin it? Was e.g. "The Tonight Show" in the 1950s already announced as "Talk Show"?

Background of the subject: In Germany it is widely believed, that "Talkshow" is a pseudo-anglicism, invented for the first German TV Talk Show by Dietmar Schönherr in 1973 (translated title of the show: "The later the night..." derived from the German saying "The later the night the sweeter the guests", and for the guests of that show some different adjectives were to be used, which became a running gag in the next day's reviews). It is also said, that in this time the commonly used English term was "Hosted Show". But this expression could not be adopted to German, because "host" or "hosted" confuses with the German word for a consecrated wafer as it does in English, too, and it could be mistranslated as a kind of "Holy Communion Show". In German "host" has only that meaning and so a new term had to be found. But maybe it is just a legende to bring Dietmar Schönherr in disrepute for being a very conflicting personality who e.g. called both himself and his hosting job in following the term "Talk Show" "The/Your Talkmaster".--46.115.20.210 (talk) 15:23, 30 July 2012 (UTC)